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Alex Thomson Racing breaks solo 24 hour distance record as Vendée Finish Nears

Doyle Sailmakers is enjoying the down to the wire pace of this years 2017 Vendée Globe unfolding this week. With UK sailor, Alex Thomson, on board HUGO Boss, and Armel LeCléac’h just 42.2 nautical miles ahead, we have seen seamanship, racing skills, and the sheer skills of both sailors. In the case of Alex Thomson, it’s been an absolute pleasure to work with Alex Thomson Racing through the Vendée Globe campaign.

“There is lots of talk about different foils we have on Hugo Boss but as always the speed edge we have does not come from one place and the other place where we are completely different to the other IMOCA 60’s is our sails, which obviously play a huge part in this race.” says Thomson, speaking from on board Hugo Boss. “The number of sails we can carry is limited to nine and they have to be light enough to be used single-handed and strong enough to survive the world’s toughest yacht race, so it’s a tough challenge for sail designers. The design team at Doyle Sails put in a huge amount of effort in the last two years to help us come up with the right suit of sails for Hugo Boss; the Stratis product lends itself brilliantly and I would be very surprised if anyone has anything as light and as durable as we have. It just goes to show that if you want something different, something fast, if you want an edge, it is best to not follow the crowd.”

Thomson has not only shown that his sail inventory has kept him very much in the hunt for first to finish, but Thomson has just set a new solo 24 hour distance record!! Sailing an incredible 536.81 nautical miles in 24 hours, Alex has beaten Francois Gabart’s previous world distance record of 534.48 in the Vendée Globe.

Doyle Sailmakers is proud to be rooting for all of the incredible sailors in the Vendée Globe, but in particular we must tip our hats to the talented Alex Thomson.

When asked what he thought Alex’s secret was, Robbie Doyle’s response was, “If anyone saw Alex’s video of a couple of days ago, they saw his secret: absolute calm. This was just hours before he went on to set the world 24 hour record for solo sailing of 536.81 nm! I had the privilege to participate in some sail and boat testing with Alex when he was in Newport. Even though he was still working out the kinks, our speed edge was obvious.  At the end of the day he asked, “Any suggestions?” As one who is not reticent to respond to such queries, all I could say was,  “Perfect what you have, and hold it together.” Even with a broken foil, he has more than held it together. It is going to be an exciting and challenging race to the finish. Regardless of who wins, both Alex and Armel have set a new standard for not only solo sailing, but monohull sailing itself.”

1,2 at Star Schoonmaker Cup

Mark Mendalblatt and Brian Fatih: 1st at 2016 Schoonmaker Cup

Doyle would like to congratulate our customers Mark Mendalblatt/Brian Fatih and Paul Cayard/Josh Revkin on finishing first and second place respectively at the Schoonmaker Cup this past weekend in Miami. This is part one of five of the Star Winter Series and was attended by 24 teams. Doyle Star sails are designed and produced at our loft in Salem, MA.

Scuttlebutt Article: Schoonmaker Cup

Schoonmaker Cup Yachtscoring Results

A few more days of our 10% Discount: Order Form

Doyle Star Sail Descriptions

A History of Proven Doyle Star Sail Results

Schoonmaker Cup Awards: 1st place Mendalblatt/Fatih

Schoonmaker Cup Awards: 2nd place Cayard/Revkin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Half of Star North American’s top ten powered by Doyle

The 2016 edition of the Star Class North American Championship was held at Chicago Yacht Club. Despite an early seasons change occurring this fall, the organizers and volunteers put on a solid event. Although the tune up regatta was light, the primary event was overall a breezy one, with the second race abandoned and the second day called off for the day. Despite beginning the third day with an inability to anchor the RC boat, the organized found a window late in the day to get two races off. Only the final day brought medium breeze in race four and a light air race five ending in drifting conditions.
Chicago Yacht Club Race Committee in tricky conditions
Doyle was excited to have five boats in the top ten. Our sails have consistently had upwind speed in heavy air, which was showcased by early regatta favorite and concluding winner, Melleby/Revkin. Doyle currently offers two varieties of jibs. The J6R, which Melleby was using, is a great uprange jib. Its cloth held up well and the radial panel layout allows for no stretch or extra fullness, reminding us of why the J6R is so successful in medium to heavy air conditions. Anosov/Caesar, third place finishers, used both the J6R and J8C, which gave him good range and power for the extreme wave conditions. Both sails use a Dimension Polyant square weave cloth, which can clearly take a beating, making either jib ideal for long events or use in multiple regattas.
Melleby/Revkin 8177 and Hornos/Baltins 8367
Doyle recently updated the luff curve on our mains (M14+ and M14R), which was noticed by fifth place finisher, Will Swigart. His radial main allowed him and crew, Brian Fatih, to have good beats and perform well. The biggest story of this event, however, was the use of the new Burton mast by both Melleny and Anosov. Anosov had previously won the 2016 District 1 Championship with this stiffer mast. It became clear before that event that mainsail development would be needed to match the increased stiffness of the Burton. Anosov used the M5B design. Since then, he and Doyle’s Jud Smith have been the leaders for main development.
Winners of Star North Americans (Melleby/Revkin)

After sailing with the new mast, using various mains, and analyzing photos, Jud has come up with a suitable main for the Burton mast, versus the standard Emmetti. Melleby used M11B and Anasov used M5B, which can tolerate a firmer leech and a more open top batten compared to M14+ on a stiffer mast. The speed of both Anosov and Melleby at North Americans is a promising first sign of this new mast design and complimenting Doyle main design. Going forward, Doyle Sails will continue to work with Arthur Anosov, Josh Revkin, and Rob Burton to produce quality sails for both Emmetti and Burton spars.

 Contact Doyle One Design’s Tomas Hornos for more information
Loft: 978-740-5950
onedesign@doylesails.com

Doyle Podium Finish at J70 Worlds

Jud Smith brought a new team together for the Rolex Big Boat Series, hosted by Saint Francis Yacht Club, serving as the only opportunity for Africa to get up to speed on bay conditions in San Francisco prior to the Worlds, a far cry from East Coast conditions.  This team consisted of Victor Diaz (tactician), Alec Anderson (trimmer), and Ed Wright (strategist.) Racing at 730 pounds (not particularly heavy relative to other teams), they finished fourth in the big boat series and went on to get a podium finish of third in the Worlds, scoring more first place finishes than any other boat.

For this windy event, Jud used the same jib design, Doyle J6R, which won him the light air San Diego North Americans. This design has always had a much higher clew, which allows for more effective inhauling and a longer foot (since all the girth measurement points move closer to the head.) Inhauling assists with pointing and improves the effective performance range of the one and only jib. We use Dimension ProRadial HTP, as it has the lowest stretch and can handle the abuse of constantly furling and flogging during starts and wind shots.

Our Doyle M2 CrossCut mainsail sets up on a straighter mast than the competition. We target no more than 3 cm of pre-bend at the base setting for 10 to 11 knots of wind. Although Doyle sails are considered fast in lighter conditions, Africa won the heaviest air race during the Worlds by a big margin. Our upwind sails are built from heavier, lower stretch, more durable fabric. We added luff curve to our main prior to Rolex to improve the heavy air performance without compromising our light air speed.

This summer, we developed the AIRX 650 Spinnaker we used at Worlds. We found this design had more power all the time, from soaking to full planing conditions. Our speed advantage has generally been upwind, but we now have an edge downwind, which did not go unnoticed. The kite allowed the team to improve their downwind planing technique each day, knowing the difference between a good run and a bad one can change the outcome of a regatta in just one leg.

Africa downwind at Worlds 2016Learning to sail the boat flatter upwind and depower just enough to accelerate again after a nasty set of waves took some getting used to. Every beat of the Rolex series, the team did a better job of steering and trimming to maintain that mode and accelerate in waves without heeling too much. At the top of the wind range, they tensioned the rig to the highest setting with tighter lowers, allowing use of the backstay without washing out the main. Doyle refined our rig setting protocol to a 2:1 ration of turns above base. Considering numerous poor starts, Jud became very confident in their speed, as they were forced to sail back ‘from the dead’ in bad air and skinny lanes.

Transitioning from the big boat series to the Worlds, the size of the fleet doubled and the new PRO, Mark Foster, was using a midline boat. It quickly became clear on the practice day that the committee was prepared to identify as many OCS boats as they could. Therefore, Africa took conservative and cautious pings with their Velocitek and would check their pings by running the line. Jud believes some teams are not careful enough with how they ping the line.

The first two days of the Worlds, the wind was strong enough to get racing off on time.  The earlier races as the wind was filling in were the most challenging.  During the morning races, the middle and left side could fill in first and the breeze could wobble left or right.  Not only were there patches of pressure, but there were big holes downwind that were deadly if caught in one.   The heavier air afternoon races were more straight forward starting and speed contests, and the faster boats found their way to the top of the fleet by the end of the race.  The afternoon races were generally in the ebb and got thrashy with short steep waves, much as we saw in Rolex regatta. Africa performed best in this condition relative to other teams, and it showed as they led the regatta for the first two days.  Even after the first 5 races, the top five boats were very close in the standings.

The third day was the most challenging, featuring very erratic wind and pressure, since the wind took much longer to fill in during the afternoon.   Even then, the wind did not fill down into the right side of the course.This is the day that decided the regatta.  Several of the top boats including Africa, got caught in much lighter air on the run by gybing early.   Africa and Petite Terrible got caught on wrong side of run in race 9. Flojito got caught in that light air side on the run of race 10.  Catapult stayed on the train downwind in those races and ground back to have all top 10 finishes in those challenging races 8, 9 and 10.  Finally, during race ten, conditions became fresher as the wind filled in and Africa managed another first.

Going into the final day, Africa was in 4th, knowing they needed two good races for a chance at a podium finish. They had a good start, sailed all the way out on Starboard tack to stay ahead of Calvi Network (who was within striking distance.) Flojito and Catapult went right, and although leading their side, Africa led that first beat and remained in first during race 11, bumping them up in the standings. The final race had breeze, but the standings remained the same as the top five boats in the race were the top five boats in the standings.

For Doyle, we were very pleased with a podium finish, Africa having improved their heavy air technique and speed significantly. It is obvious Africa is no longer considered a ‘light air flyer.’ Doyle sails and our recommended set up are fast in all conditions upwind and downwind, which didn’t go unnoticed. Jud is very pleased they had the chance to compete at that level and is now looking forward to sharing lessons learned with the J70 fleet in preparation for the 2017 season and the 2018 World Championship in his hometown of Marblehead, MA.

Doyle J70 Sail Descriptions

J70 Order Form

Doyle J70 Race Results

Doyle J70 Tuning Guide & Matrix

Strong Performance from Doyle Sails at 2016 St Barths Bucket Regatta

St_Barths_Bucket_v2016_logo_128In the increasingly performance-focused superyacht racing scene, Doyle Sails helped propel many yachts to the front of the fleet at this years St Barths Bucket, held off St Barthelemy from March 17-20.  In the end, Doyle powered yachts won three of the five pursuit classes that saw nearly 40 yachts competing.  The regatta saw the fleet sail three races around the archipelago, which challenges the yachts with close roundings around islands and rocks, making the imagery even more stunning.  This year saw moderate breezes for the first two days of racing, and then high winds and big seas in the final day to push all the crews hard to keep these massive yachts moving well.

Sailing Yacht P2

38m Perini Navi P2

38m Perini Navi sloop P2 continued her string of impressive performances with a win in Class B: Les Elegantes des Mers.  P2 has long been a superyacht regatta favorite, and just the previous week P2 won Class B at the Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta in Virgin Gorda.  Under new ownership this year, the boat has continued her impressive ways, and after P2‘s win on Saturday’s “Not So Wiggley Course”, which sees the yachts weave through a number of turns which requires multiple spinnaker sets and douses, tactician Tony Rey commented “The owner and his guests were so engaged and so into the race; everyone was excited.  Honestly, it’s what we came here for; these last two races have been some of the best superyacht racing I’ve ever done. We can’t wait until tomorrow.”  P2 has been carrying the same Doyle Stratis Carbon/Technora racing sails since 2013, and her consistent performance is a testament to the incredibly fast shapes and durability of the Stratis sails.

S&S 125 Axia beating upwind with her new Double Headrig Configuration

In Class C: Les Femmes des Mers 37.6m Axia won with an impressively consistent performance, winning all three races.  Doyle’s own CEO Robbie Doyle was serving as tactician for the regatta, and worked well in advance to help prepare the yacht for the regatta.  In order to keep Axia at the front of the fleet (they also won their class at last years St Barths Bucket) and optimize their rating under the ORCsy Rule, under which the boats are rated for this regatta, Axia went through an headsail development program to improve their tacking time and pointing ability.  The result was a larger staysail and enlarged Jib Top, in place of the original racing Genoa, which kept the yacht fast and nimble as they sailed around the island.  What might be most impressive  about this win is that the same Stratis Main on Axia has now powered the boat through six Buckets – helping the yacht win three of those – in addition to all her other sailing and charters.

56m Perini Navi Rosehearty

56m Perini Navi Rosehearty

In Class E: Les Grandes Dames des Meres 56m Rosehearty and 50m Ohana finished tied at the end of the final day, with Rosehearty’s wins in Races 1 and 2 breaking the tie in her favor.  After winning last year’s Perini Navi Cup, Rosehearty was fitted with a new A3 spinnaker and Mizzen Staysail to ensure that the boat could keep moving at full speed during the Bucket’s many challenging courses.  On the final day of racing, the big breeze helped push the massive yacht at 13.5 knots downwind, but upwind proved a challenge.  A fitting on the genoa furler snapped off in a puff, forcing the yacht to sail a good portion of the long upwind beat with just a staysail. Ultimately the genoa was partially unfurled to keep the boat moving steadily upwind to the turning mark.  Paul Cayard, serving as tactician on Rosehearty, commended the crew of Rosehearty all week, but was especially impressed on the final day “The crew did an outstanding job of dealing with today’s adversity and kept the maneuvers tight so we could preserve the fourth place we needed to win overall. A very happy owner and all concerned.”

The overall results of Doyle Sails this year are a testament to the continuing focus on performance and service from the team at Doyle. The regatta brings a strong team of sailmakers from Doyle’s lofts around the world to ensure that the yachts receive the full benefit of their sails. “I’m incredibly proud of our customers for the results in this year’s event, and it’s truly a testament to the team at Doyle we have assembled in order to help these yachts perform to their best” commented CEO Robbie Doyle.  “Our technology in recent years has continually kept our sails at the front of the fleet, but this year’s team onsite was the best we’ve ever had and helped get everyone across the line safely and quickly.  The results this year show both the grand-prix performance that our sails can achieve, but also the durability and shape holding of these sails over time.”
P3

60m Perini Navi Sloop Perseus^3

This year saw Robbie Doyle and Glenn Cook from Doyle Salem on Axia, Andrew Schneider of Doyle Salem on Rosehearty, Peter Grimm of Doyle Florida East on Perseus^3, Quinten Houry of Doyle Palma on Clan VIII, John Baxter from Doyle Midwest on Blue Too, Nick Bonner of Doyle England on Surama, Simon Lacey of Doyle New Zealand on Emmaline, Matt Bridge of Doyle New Zealand on Seahawk, Alan McGlashan of Doyle Salem on Bella Regazza, and Mario Giattino and Salvo D’amico of Doyle Italy and Justin Ferris of Doyle New Zealand on Ohana.

Doyle Sailmakers is proud to have a long history as a sponsor of the Bucket regattas, and has established lofts in all of the superyacht hubs around the world to ensure excellent service for the world’s largest yachts.  Recently Doyle has delivered sails to many of the world’s largest yachts, including the 60m Perini Navi Perseus^3, which made her debut at St Barths this year, the 46m Royal Huisman Elfje,and the 89m Perini Navi Maltese Falcon.  In the coming months Doyle Sailmakers will deliver sails to the two largest sailing yachts in the world, both measuring over 100m in length.

Full results can be found here.

Relative Obscurity Top American J/70 at KWRW

Relative Obscurity  ( Allen Clark / Photo Boat )

A windy and cool Key West Race Week wrapped up last week, with 48 boats racing in the J/70 class. At Doyle Sailmakers, we were very pleased with two boats in the top ten and Peter Duncan’s Relative Obscurity clinching second place to be the top American finisher. We were able to have a conversation with Peter after the event for his perspective on the event. Peter was quick to note the merits of his exceptional team of multiple world champion winners Moose McClintock and Karl Anderson, as well as North American Champion Victor Diaz. They were sailing in the range of 730-740 pounds, which Peter finds to be a comfortable weight in all conditions, but particularly in waves where having weight on the rail is important.

While Duncan primarily campaigns his Etchells, the transition to the J/70 has been a good one, and Relative Obscurity was 7th at the 2015 Worlds in La Rochelle, France. While the Key West fleet was still smaller than Worlds, the top end of the fleet was still incredibly competitive with the top three finishers at World’s competing against each other again.

Relative Obscurity

Comparing the two events, Duncan noted Key West was breezier, with much bumpier seas, so they had to work to keep the boat powered up more.  Because of other commitments, and the weather just prior to the regatta, the preparation was condensed and forced the team to make sure the boat was well prepared so there were no hiccups in the event.  Each day of the event, Relative Obscurity was able to do a couple of hours of two boat tuning with my team on Africa. Both boats were using Doyle Cross Cut Class Main, Pro Radial Jibs and VMG Spinnakers for the regatta.  We were able to test not only tuning for the conditions and weight placement, but also learn a lot about the course with five minute split tacks and split gybes on each side of the race track.

The team primarily relied on Commanders for weather and forecasting, which the race committee kept heavy tabs on as well and Duncan found to be very good throughout the week.

Starts were extremely important with such a large fleet on a short starting line. I asked Duncan about his regatta and starting strategy. At first, they were tentative, but they switched to a more aggressive mode and ended up over the line early twice. On one occasion, they were able to come back and win the race, whereas the other OCS was more difficult to dig out of and they placed 21st, their throw out. These made them more conservative, trying to attack the line without pushing it too hard. They tended towards the favored end of the line, but prioritized less crowded areas. Peter figures they sailed the first weather beat fairly conservatively, never really losing contact with the fleet. Their results were very consistent in this competitive fleet, which they achieved by getting to the edges, without ever going for anything really extraordinary. Each crew member clicked into a specific role on the boat, with McClintock in charge of overall strategy, Diaz calling boat to boat tactics, and Anderson keeping his head in the boat for tuning and sail trim.

Moose McClintock, who has now sailed with a number of different J70 programs, had some interesting

Relative Obscurity ( Allen Clark / Photo Boat)

observations regarding the Jib in particular. “I was impressed with the ease of using the sails.  I prefer pull and go so I can keep my head out of the boat and I think you achieve this in your designs.  I think we learned a lot about the inhaul use on the Pro radial Jib over the course of the week, having Victor aboard was critical for us as he used the same inhaul technique on the Jib that you used at North Americans.  He did say after sailing Friday that the inhaul was the key on Friday as he ended up with the same jib sheet setting and played the inhaul depending on how much power he needed, mostly a different way to get to the same end.   Eye opening for me.”

With fast upwind and downwind speed and an obviously harmonious team, Peter is planning to do Bacardi Cup, North Americans in Texas, Europeans in Germany, and Worlds in San Francisco, hopefully with a similar team depending on everyone’s schedule.

KWRW Results

Relative Obscurity ( Allen Clark / Photo Boat )

La Tormenta wins the Etchells Sid Doren

In the Etchells class, the Sidney Doren Memorial Regatta took place January 9-10,2016, hosted by Biscayne Bay Yacht Club. Shannon Bush, sailing with Brad Boston and Curt Oetking on La Tormenta, came out on top with a ten point lead. The three have been racing together for the past three years, and Boston believes they work really well together and most importantly, are able to have a lot of fun which allows for enjoyable regattas.  The team has had good events in the past and won smaller events, but this was the first major event they won together. Shannon and her team are always trying to climb the ladder and be faster, which seemed to click this regatta.

Catching up with Brad after the regatta, he explained that their regatta strategy was to capitalize on their boat speed, which Brad claims is incredible. Therefore, they would prioritize a big hole at the start, while trying to be as close to the favored end as possible while avoiding traffic.  The Midline boat worked well for La Tormenta and they started there in 3 out of the 4 races such that they seemed to be able to do as they pleased off the line for the first few minutes. Consistency is always a key factor and Brad figures they were able to pull that off by letting their speed get them out of any bad positions and by staying relaxed. The team would get away from the fleet and slowly pick their way through with clear air and clean lanes.  To accomplish this speed, they used Doyle’s AP-2 Main, VMG bi-radial spinnaker, and alternated between the Marblehead Light Jib (MHL) in lower velocity conditions until two people were on the deck, when they switched to the DCM Jib to hold for the remainder of the time.

Doyle Etchells Miami 2016When to change sails and settings had been the focus of the last several regattas and during the practice time prior to the Sid Doren. La Tormenta tuned up against Peter Duncan and Jud Smith’s team on Raging Rooster, and they both received some help from Moose McClintock on a powerboat. For weather models and forecasting, the team depended on Commanders, Wind Finder, and Sail Flow. Although the models were all slightly different, there was agreement that the wind would trend right, so they were sure to protect the right, especially when dark clouds came in.

We also asked Brad how his success as a five-time Viper 640 North American Champion translated into the Etchells Class. Aside from being accustomed to racing in large fleets, Brad insisted that it was the absolute inverse. The Etchells is a highly technical boat, which doesn’t have huge speed changes like a sport boat might, so every little thing matters. It is one of Brad’s favorite fleets to race in because the skills he learns from racing Etchells in speed and tuning carry over to all other one design classes. Congratulations La Tormenta on a great win on Biscayne Bay.

Full results can be found here.

For more information about Doyle’s Etchells Sails, please visit here.