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Archive for the ‘Awards’ Category

Doyle Sails Dominate 2015 Marblehead NOOD Regatta

Marblehead Race Week, now sailed as the Marblehead NOOD Regatta, got underway last week for the 126th running of the regatta with 140 boats competing in 9 different One Design Classes.  As is the case in many years, Doyle-powered boats won the majority of the classes at the Marblehead NOOD Regatta, one of the northeast’s premier annual One-Design Regattas.   Among other highlights, Doyle customers swept the podium in the Rhodes 19, Town Class, and IOD classes, as well as winning the J/70, J/105 at Etchells classes.

Holley WinIn the Rhodes 19 class, the fleet saw one of the most competitive finishes in recent history, with 7 lead changes over the 4 day event and a mere 8 points separated first through sixth.  In the end, Jamie Holley, sailing Mankini with his wife Janice for the first three days and then his son Cameron for the final day, took home the win in a tie-breaker.    When asked what his favorite part of race week was, Jamie answered, “My family. My wife crewed the first few days, and then my son did the last.”  Team Mankini was named the overall winner of Race Week for their performance.Race Week-0040

Holley and his crew beat out second place co-skippers Ken Cormier and Steve Dalton in an overall points tie because Holley ended with two race wins compared to Cormier’s one – both of which he scored in the final two races. “It was a very tough week of sailing,” said Holley. “We were only one of two fleets that had to sail all four days. We were 12 points down coming into the last day of sailing, and we pulled through.”  He added, “There was everything from light air and flat water, to heavy air and high seas. I want to say it takes consistency to win, but we weren’t very consistent. There were at times five boats wide round the mark, and sometimes other factors made it a very complicated regatta.” Interestingly, in the 33-boat fleet, Holley was the only one to win more than one race, with 10 others each winning one race.  Holley was using Doyle’s well proven race sails that have been extensively developed in recent years.

J/70 Africa 2015 NOOD Regatta

Africa Comes into the Windward Mark in the Lead

In the 23-boat J/70 fleet, Jud Smith and AFRICA put on a dominating performance, much of which Smith attributes to just plain better boat speed, coupled with some strong tactical calls from his wife Cindy.  The regatta also doubled as the J/70 New England Championship, and featured some strong competition from as far away as Texas.  Winning 5 of the 10 races, Smith felt good in the range of conditions he saw through the three days of racing.  “We felt like our upwind boat speed and pointing ability was phenomenal.  We’ve fine tuned the jib design a bit in the last few months to allow us to inhaul better which helps with out height off the line.  We were sailing a bit heavy this regatta, so making sure we made our gains upwind was essential to making the whole race work” commented Smith reflecting on the week.  At the end of the regatta, he received the Norman E. Cressy Trophy, which is awarded by the Marblehead Racing Association to the skipper who best displays the outstanding performance at Marblehead Race Week as it relates to fleet competitiveness, sportsmanship and overall smart sailing.  In addition to Smith, three of the top four Corinthian Teams were using Doyle Sails.

Doyle J/105 Sails

allegro semplicita Powers in to the Windward Mark

In the J/105 Class, it was Fred deNapoli on Allegro Semplicita who came away with the win after several lead changes.  Despite his success in other regattas with his boat, deNapoli  had to be pleased with his performance this year, as he previously looked back on his 12 years in the class, remarking “In 2003, I borrowed a J/105 and came in second by a point or two. Last year I again came in second by a point or so. We’ve always been the bridesmaid, and never the bride.”  deNapoli was using Doyle’s latest Stratis jib design, along with a AP Crosscut Main and Airx 700 Class Spinnaker.

Doyle Town Class Sails

Berit Solstad on Lille Venn

In the Town Class, sailing with one of the largest fleets in recent memory. Berit Solstad came away with a commanding victory over local rival Kelley Braun.  After years of dominance in the Town Class, Doyle successful introduced a new mainsail design, which was utilized by Solstad in the victory.

The Etchells fleet, a longtime favorite in Marblehead, was also successful for Doyle One Design’s own Tomas Hornos, who came away with the win after winning half of the 8 races.  Hornos is a relative newcomer in the Etchells fleet, but has put together a string of impressive performances in the last year.

Race Week-0045-1The Marblehead IOD fleet has always been one of the most photogenic fleets around, with classic boats and matching fleet sails, which make for close racing.  This year it was Charlie Richter racing Javelin who came out on top.  Doyle has been proud to supply sails to the IOD fleet in Marblehead, among other venues, and has consistently produced top level sails that perform well over the many years that the sails rotate through.

To learn more about Doyle’s One Design Sails, please visit here.

For Full Regatta Results, please visit here.

Pictures courtesy Bruce Durkee

Shaun Frohlich wins British Etchells Nationals

Shuan Frolich of team Exabyte win the 2015 British Nationals and Open Championship in the Etchells at the Royal London Yacht Club. Exabyte just purchased Doyle’s AP Main and DCM jib.

Shuan Frohlich wins British Etchells Nationals and Open Championship

Shuan Frohlich of team Exabyte wins British Etchells Nationals and Open Championship. Photo by Rob Goddard

“Going into the last race, race six, only Willy McNeil’s Hancock could threaten Frohlich’s regatta. Exabyte needed a sixth or better to take the championship if McNeil won the race, but with the wind that had built to 20kts, Frohlich after a clean start, sailed fast for the port lay line and the stronger westbound tide on the first beat putting him up with the front of the pack, and while Jeremy Thorp won the race, second place was enough to give Shaun Frohlich sailing with Duncan Truswell and David Bedford a very deserved overall victory of the event.” -Rob Goddard, Sail World

Doyle One Design’s Tomas Hornos Star District 1 Champ

After Doyle One Design’s Tomas Hornos and his crew, Josh Revkin, warmed up with a win at the Arms White regatta the weekend prior, they won their second consecutive year at the District 1 Championships over the weekend of June 26-28.

Tomas and Josh Revkin: District 1 Champs

Tomas and Josh Revkin: District 1 Champs 2015

The scores were very tight after a first light air day of racing, but once the breeze picked up over the weekend, Tomas and Josh crushed the competition with three bullets.

Tomas Hornos & Josh Revkin

Tomas Hornos and Josh Revkin crushing in breeze at Star District 1 Champs using M14+ Main and J8C jib

Will Swigart, traveling all the way from Hong Kong, and his crew Brian Fatih, also powered by Doyle Sails, took second and the Grand Master’s trophy.

Star Sailors League Results

Doyle Places 9 out of Top 10 at Rhodes 19 East Coast Champs 2015

A high five between the skipper and his trimmer’s son on bow captured on camera says it all for the winners of the Rhodes-19 East Coast Champs. Charlie Pendleton, Jim Raisides, and Jack Raisides on team Bight Me take top honors at this Manchester, MA event, powered by Doyle Sails. Pendleton mentioned that young Jack was, “put to work on foredeck and could be seen flying the spinnaker in the last race.”

High Five! Photo by Blake Jackson of Marblehead Studios

High Five! Photo by Blake Jackson of Marblehead Studios

Jim Raisides was kind enough to give us an overview of the event, even giving a shout out to their humble sailmakers. (Thanks!) The results do speak for themselves with Doyle Sails placing 1,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 in the event.

“There was a lot of anticipation for this year’s East Coast Championships mostly because of the venue at the Manchester Yacht Club.  It had been 25 years since Manchester had last hosted a Rhodes 19 event, surprising considering the huge Rhodes fleet in the harbor.

Twenty three boats raced the three day event with competitors coming from as far away as Chicago.  The competition was tough with three former National Championship winners and multiple East Coast Champions in the fleet.

All three days produced similar conditions, flat seas in light 5-10 knot breezes that began as a northerly and clocked right to an easterly.  Not as easy as it sounds, as the breeze was extremely shifty and included a lot of left oscillations that paid dividends up the course even though the predominate shift was right.

These conditions made it difficult for the race committee, but MYC and PRO Conway Felton ran a fantastic regatta with each race a fair test of sailing skill.  With the 23 boats over 8 races, there was only 2 general recalls, one “I” flag and no protests.

East Coast Champions on Bight Me. Photo by Blake Jackson of Marblehead Studios

East Coast Champions on Bight Me. Photo by Blake Jackson of Marblehead Studios

Charlie Pendleton, Jim Raisides and son Jack Raisides took this year’s top honors with 15 points posting 5 firsts including 3 on the first day. Dru Slattery and crew Linda Epstein were consistently quick across the regatta placing second with 31, followed in third by Jamie Holley sailing with his wife Janice and son Cameron. Doyle sails were on 9 of the top 10 boats!”

We’re realizing again and again, the Rhodes 19 is a fun fleet, with Pendleton mentioning in the class newsletter, “Shannon Lane and Charlie Thomas put on a great show, end to end.  When was the last time we had a live band at a Rhodes event!?”

Mark Mendelblatt & Brian Fatih Win Star Sailors League Finals

Mendelblatt and Fatih at Star Sailors League Finals

The combination of ideal conditions on Montagu Bay in Nassau, Bahamas, provided boats and a substantial prize purse brought out some of the very best Star sailors in the world for a week of intense competition.  The end result found Mark Mendelblatt and Brian Fatih on the podium, winning in a field that included a handful of past world champions and Olympic gold medalists.  For this regatta, the team was utilizing Doyle’s latest M14+ Main, and J6R and J8H Jibs.

Surviving the qualifying and knockout rounds to triumph, the Americans won the second Star Sailors League Finals on Saturday December 6th in a thrilling finale that came down to the final run. They bested a field that included 2012 Olympic gold medalist Freddy Loof and crew Anders Ekstrom of Sweden; Mateusz Kusznierewicz and Dominik Zycki of Poland; and Jorge Zarif and Henry Boening of Brazil.  Over the course of the regatta, the Mendleblatt and Fatih won 3 races (of 9) in the qualifying series, then finished with a 2-1-1  in the finals to secure the victory.

Star2Defending champion Robert Scheidt, a two-time Olympic gold medalist, and crew Bruno Prada of Brazil were eliminated in the semifinal. Top-ranked Diego Negri and crew Sergio Lambertenghi of Italy were eliminated in the semis.

Four days of competition meant that after three days of qualifying, the top 11 teams from the elite field of 20 advanced to the quarter-finals.  The winner of the qualifying round – Swedes Freddy Loof and Anders Ekström – went directly to the semi-finals, while the crews that qualified in 2nd to 11th positions advanced to the quarter-finals, with the best 6 going forward to the Semi. The Semi finals determined who got to sail in the grand finale, with only the top 4 advancing.  The unique elimination arrangement made every race that much more important, and put an emphasis on performing under pressure.

“The first race we were feeling in danger for sure. Halfway up the first beat we were feeling ‘This isn’t good’, you know. We talked to each other and said ‘Let’s just stay calm here and keep working together and use our speed and get back’. And it worked. We were going well.”

The quarter-finals saw plenty of competition, with last year’s runners up, Mateusz Kusznierewicz and Dominik Zycki leading early on in the race, only to have defending champions Robert Scheidt and Bruno Prada of Brazil pass them on the run. But Kusznierewicz was back in front on the second windward leg and was able to hold it to the finish. Mendelblatt and Fatih were second and third place went to the Finn world champion, Giles Scott (GBR) and Steve Milne.

Star3In the semi-final and final, however, Mendelblatt and Fatih appeared to put the afterburner’s on, to win back to back races against the very best in the Star class.  “This was a race of a lifetime,” said Mendelblatt. “To beat guys like Freddy Loof, Mateusz Kusznierewicz, and Robert Scheidt and all the other guys who are here is incredible. We did not have any expectations coming in: only to sail our best regatta. And you know these guys beat me more times than I beat them in my career as a Star sailor. With Robert, I can count the number of times I beat him on one hand and I’ve been sailing against him for 25 years so it feels great to win this event.”

The wind for the final, a six-leg race, had shifted more to the north but was anything but stable. Mendelblatt was forced to tack out from under Zarif early one which would eventually prove to be a winning move, putting Mendelblatt ahead around the first windward mark.

Doyle Star SailsOn the third beat, Kusznierewicz sneaked ahead at the top mark and led down the final leg. All of the boat were withing striking distance, with the crews aggressively working the waves while trying to play every shift as well.  Kusznierewicz appeared to have the win within grasp as the teams narrowed in on the finish line, only to have Mendelblatt and Loof, coming in on a tighter reach, sail in from leeward to take the first two places. Kusznierewicz, who was runner-up last year, finished third and the rookie, Zarif, was fourth.

“I’m really hoping that the Star Sailors League continues. I think it is fantastic. I think the Star boat obviously is bringing in the best sailors in the world still,” said Mendelblatt. “The format is excellent. It’s exciting, it’s great. I have no plans to sell my Star. I’m keeping my boat and I’m going to do some more Star regattas, for sure.”

Star17

Doyle One Design has been active in the Star class for a number of years, and this year’s Star Sailors League Finals is just the latest in a string of victories for Doyle’s Star customers.  In November, Luke Lawrence and Joshua Revkin won the Schoonmaker Cup, while in October Tomas Hornos and Revkin placed 2nd at the Star North American Championship. and in July William Swigart and Fatih teamed up to win the Cedar Point Open for the Bedford Pitcher.  Doyle’s success stems from a highly technical design process, on the water testing and constant refinements and customer service.

For full Results of the Star Sailors League Finals, please visit here.

To learn more about Doyle’s Star Sails, please visit here.

Bob Fisher contributed to this report

 

Shockwave Wins Line Honors in 2014 Newport-Bermuda Race

Shockwave Finishing Bermuda Race -4 Copyright PPL

Shockwave sailing in toward St. David’s Light. (Talbot Wilson/PPL)

George Sakellaris and the team aboard the Reichel/Pugh mini-maxi Shockwave crossed the finish line off Bermuda’s St. David’s Lighthouse Monday morning at 5:34 race time EDT (6:34AM local time). Her elapsed time was 63:04:11. The close contest between Shockwave and her rival Bella Mente, Hap Fauth’s 72 foot Judel/Vrolijk mini-maxi, was a near repeat of the 2012 race, where both boats smashed the course record and finished with Bella Mente a mere 3 minutes ahead. This year, Shockwave led by seven minutes, after the two had battled head to head within sight of each almost continuously for over 635 miles. Although the boat for boat racing was close, Shockwave won comfortably on corrected time besting her rival Bella Mente by 1 hr and 44 minutes in ORR and similar margin in IRC.

As with the 2012 Race, Robbie Doyle sailed as the “stratitician,” working with the navigator, Andrea Visintini, the Tactician, Stu Bannatyne, skipper George Sakellaris and overseeing the sail program.

Doyle said, “There was a constant analysis and dialog onboard as the position of the Stream was fluid, and the weather pattern was also shifting. We had to hunt to find the (Gulf) Stream… we never found the 4 knot real road to Bermuda. It had broken up before we got there. Forecasters had predicted it might, but they suggested we might get there before it would start to dismember. The Stream was really breaking up pretty quick.”

Shockwave Coming in to the Finish Monday Morning. PHOTO CREDIT: Barry Pickthall/PPL

Shockwave Coming in to the Finish Monday Morning. PHOTO CREDIT: Barry Pickthall/PPL

“We tried some new ideas and ways to optimize the boat for the ORR rule” explained Doyle. “Bella Mente is a more powerful reaching boat than Shockwave so in order to defend our 2012 victory we felt we needed to improve our rating as we did not feel we could beat her in a reaching drag race which the Bermuda Race can often be. After a detailed weather analysis of the past 10 races over a 20 year period we made the decision to switch to a fractional spinnaker hoist. We designed and built a new full size Fractional Code 0 (labeled Super-FRO by the crew) to complement our existing smaller FRO. We only carried one free-flying spinnaker and then two Fractional Code 0′s.”   Both FROs were set on top down-furlers for easy sail handling and crossovers. The combination proved successful, as the powerful “Super FRO” carried the boat through some crucial transitions.  “Surprisingly its best moment came when VMG running in 8 knots TWS into head seas with Bella Mente right on our tail. Even though she was carrying a full size mast head spinnaker we were able to open up on her with the more stable Super FRO.”

Doyle CFD worked on the analysis to ensure the corner loading was in line with the boat

Doyle CFD ‘s analysis was critical to ensuring the Super FRO’s success onboard Shockwave

“We had one day of practice with the Super FRO, during which we saw what a powerful weapon it could be, but also how much it really loaded up the sprit. We had Doyle’s CFD team working with Reichel/Pugh’s office to re-engineer the sprit to handle the sail, and the guys were reinforcing the sprit until 3am the morning of the start!  A total team effort to pull off this incredible result again.”

The win adds to Shockwave’s growing list of recent victories, highlighted by their division win in the 2012 Newport-Bermuda Race, the 2013 Montego Bay, and the 2014 RORC Caribbean 600 Race. Originally launched in 2008 as Alpha Romero 3, Shockwave has proven to be a dominant force in the last 3 years.  Doyle Sailmakers has been intimately involved in the boats resurgence, helping optimize not only the sail program, but also the mast and keel for a full aero and hydrodynamic package.

For more information on the Newport-Bermuda Race, please visit here.

Results from this years race can be found here.

 

Robbie Doyle on the Bermuda Race: Strategy, Sails, & Crew Care

Robbie Doyle will start his 12th Newport Bermuda Race when the fleet leaves Newport on June 20th.  He is what he calls the “stratitician” on board George Sakellaris’ Shockwave, 2012 winner of the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy and the North Rock Beacon Trophy as top IRC boat in the race. We caught up with Robbie at the Doyle sail loft in Salem, Mass.

Bermuda Race Prize giving at Government House presented by His Excellency Mr George Fergusson, the Governor of Bermuda. Shockwave – Robbie Doyle – George W Mixter Trophy Gibbs Hill navigator. Photo by Barry Pickthall


Q.  To get an edge on the competition, what should competitors, navigators, or tacticians be doing now to get prepared for the race in mid-June?

For all competitors, right now you should be reviewing the weather from past races and watching the Gulf Stream and surrounding eddies. Begin to get a feel for what to expect in terms of weather and determine how the Gulf Stream is setting up and moving. Don’t wait until two days before the race to do this. The Gulf Stream and accompanying meanders and eddies play a key role in the race so you need to know where all the key elements will be when you get there, not just at the start.

Q. As well as watching the Gulf Stream, how important are weather patterns and forecasts and why?

My first Newport Bermuda Race was 38 years ago and we relied on celestial navigation, and much of the weather was predicted by the navigator’s arthritis. The prevailing strategy was what emerged from past races. It was basically thought that you head 180 degrees until you get into the Gulf Stream, and then head for Bermuda.  Along with everything else, weather forecasting has gotten a lot more accurate but you still cannot trust the forecast 100 percent.

On Shockwave we are preparing with the goal of winning it.  So, currently, we are doing a study on weather data over the decades and we are basing our analysis on a number of factors.  The reason the weather predictions are so important is that we will decide on our sail inventory from our analysis. If we choose wrongly, or if I advise wrongly, that does not give me a warm, fuzzy feeling. These decisions of what sails to bring and what sails to leave behind are a huge factor in preparing for the race and can determine a great deal. We need to submit our rating by May 22 so most key decisions must be made by then.  We will make our macro inventory decisions then but exactly which sails come and go will be decided the day of the race. Despite all the technology we have, you never win the Newport Bermuda Race if you don’t make some big guesses and that is all part of what it takes to win the race.

 Q. Are there some factors that many competitors could take greater notice of as they consider their competitive strategy?

Yes, and it is about sail inventory. Read the ORR rules again or talk to your local sailmaker.  The rules have a clear effect on the sail inventory because with ORR rules you are rated with the spinnaker factored into your rating whether you choose to use one or not. You are rated based upon the minimum ORR area whether your actual spinnaker is that size or not.  If your spinnaker is larger than the ORR area your rating goes up, but not vice versa. Some teams will have a spinnaker on the boat that may be well under what you are rated for.  Similarly, you are charged for a minimum jib area and a cruising boat with a non-overlapping genoa is likely to be under that for jib area. It is very easy to miss these details and you should take time right now to figure out your sail inventory to your best advantage.

 Q.  What are some common pitfalls for competitors?

You want to make sure you establish your watch system immediately and stick to it from the start. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to get into a rhythm and stay rested.  People tend to want to stay engaged or participating in the decisions even when they are off watch -but it is better to preserve your energy. You will need it.  Another pitfall is that you don’t rest on your laurels after you pass through the Gulf Stream. As a rule the sea state is calmer but people are tired and it is very easy to stop thinking strategically.  There remain a lot of tricky currents and decisions made in the final 200 miles of the race where it can be won or lost.

5-1.158C.Shockwavecockpit.JR-Copy-300x225

Seen here after the 2012 Bermuda Race, the R/P 72 Shockwave recently was overall winner of the 2014 Caribbean 600. Photo by John Rousmaniere

Q. What else have you learned about the Bermuda Race?

The more I learn about the race and the more I know, the less confident I have become about winning it. The Newport Bermuda Race is one of the most challenging races of all time. You have the Gulf Stream, with hot and cold air meeting each other. It is an oceanographic and meteorological laboratory and we are the RATS! It is really, really tricky. It is always interesting, challenging, and rewarding to take part in.

– See more at: http://bermudarace.com/robbie-doyle-bermuda-race-strategy-sail-selection-crew-care/

– Written by Laurie Fullerton