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Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Inaugural J/70 Worlds will feature top Doyle Sailors and Sailmakers

Doyle Sailmakers is proud to be involved in the inaugural J/70 Worlds in Newport, R.I., running from September 8-13 at the New York Yacht Club.  Many of our Doyle customers and sailmakers will be competing in this inaugural event. Doyle’s One Design team has built sails for many of the competitors and with over 90 boats on the starting line for this event, the starting line will be crowded with numerous world champions in other classes – all vying to be the first J/70 world champion.

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The boat has also recently been chosen as Sailing World’s 2014 Boat of the Year and is designated as an International Class by ISAF (International Sailing Federation). At only two and half years old but over 600 boats sailing in over 20 countries, Doyle Sailmakers is proud to be one of the premiere one-design sailmakers for the fleet.

Adding to the luster of competing in the inaugural worlds is the fact that many of Doyle’s sailmakers will be a part of this event, including 2006 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year Jud Smith, who has been building sails for many Doyle customers in the J/70 fleet as they prepare for this event.

“Although this is the Worlds, at this time it will primarily US Boats being sailed but this will be the regatta to peak for,” Smith said. “It will be interesting to see how some of the boats do who are peaking right now. There are some boats who are at the right time to peak and there are certain players who have emerged strong very recently – so this is their time.”

Relative_ObscurityMany Doyle customers and sailmakers will be at this event. Peter Duncan, who got into the J/70 class early on, has been training all summer after campaigning his Etchells for most of last year. Sailing USA 49 “Relative Obscurity”  he brings along long-time crew Tom Blackwell and has added Mark Ivy and Doyle’s own Greg Marie.  Earlier this year, Duncan finished 3rd in the 40 boat fleet at Bacardi Miami Sailing Week.

Jud Smith will be sailing with his wife Cindy, Jake Ladow, and Doyle One Design’s Will Felder.  Earlier this summer, Smith won the J/70 class at the Marblehead NOOD regatta.

Doyle CFD’s Tyler Doyle, who has spent extensive time developing proprietary software to analyze sail shape and boat setup in real time for the J/70, will be sailing with Chris Boulter, Indre Jankeviciute, and Terra Berlinski on USA 245.

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Brad Boston of Doyle Boston (Canada), fresh from winning the Viper 640 North Americans last week, will be racing with team “Hooligan”, with skipper Tres Sheehan, Curtis Florence and Lindsay Bartal.

Mark Ploch of Doyle City Island in New York will be racing his USA 61 “Sugar Daddy” with Mark Foster, Rob Fear and Tomas Hornos from Doyle One Design.

We are looking forward to a very exciting and successful regatta.

Full regatta information can be found here.

Shockwave wins Copa del Rey 2014

Shockwave ArialLaced with the Who’s Who of the sailing world, the Mini-Maxi Class (IRC0) in this year’s Copa del Rey regatta provided very close and exciting racing throughout the week long, 10 race event. Leading from start to finish was the oldest boat in the fleet – the Reichel/Pugh 72 Shockwave – skippered by George Sakellaris and powered by Doyle Sails, including her latest Stratis ICE headsails. This inshore regatta win complements the Shockwave Team’s offshore victories in this year’s Newport-Bermuda Race where Shockwave was the elapsed time winner, while sweeping 1st overall in the Gibbs Hill Division under IRC and ORR. In the spring of this year Shockwave won overall the rough and tumble Caribbean 600 Race.

The secret to Shockwave’s success has always been the combination of all aspects of the latest technology driven by a close knit team sailing the boat. Doyle’s CFD Team led by Tyler Doyle worked with Reichel/Pugh to fine tune the keel and bulb, and worked with the Future Fibre’s team to optimize the mast in terms of weight and windage. Similarly all sail decisions in terms of inventory, and shapes are done with in-depth CFD analysis with the CFD team working with the sail design team to analyze effects on performance and rating.

Shockwave Copa del Rey 2014

One of the latest advances for this regatta came from utilizing Doyle’s latest Stratis ICE fiber, which allowed the team to create a new jib which maintained the standard ultra-light weight requirements of the program while still maintaining its shape through a wide range, so that a single jib could be used from 10 to 22 knots.

Four out of the five Mini Maxi boats won at least one of the 10 races held, and the top three teams faced the last day separated by only three points. The title was decided in the final race with victory and championship for Shockwave with 19 points, and Hap Fauth’s Bella Mente, with a partial Doyle inventory, on 22 points, and Roberto Tomasini’s Robertissima III, on 23 points, completing the podium.

Shockwave Awards Ceremony

 

For full results, please visit here.

To learn more about Stratis ICE, please visit here.

Shockwave Wins Line Honors in 2014 Newport-Bermuda Race

Shockwave Finishing Bermuda Race -4 Copyright PPL

Shockwave sailing in toward St. David’s Light. (Talbot Wilson/PPL)

George Sakellaris and the team aboard the Reichel/Pugh mini-maxi Shockwave crossed the finish line off Bermuda’s St. David’s Lighthouse Monday morning at 5:34 race time EDT (6:34AM local time). Her elapsed time was 63:04:11. The close contest between Shockwave and her rival Bella Mente, Hap Fauth’s 72 foot Judel/Vrolijk mini-maxi, was a near repeat of the 2012 race, where both boats smashed the course record and finished with Bella Mente a mere 3 minutes ahead. This year, Shockwave led by seven minutes, after the two had battled head to head within sight of each almost continuously for over 635 miles. Although the boat for boat racing was close, Shockwave won comfortably on corrected time besting her rival Bella Mente by 1 hr and 44 minutes in ORR and similar margin in IRC.

As with the 2012 Race, Robbie Doyle sailed as the “stratitician,” working with the navigator, Andrea Visintini, the Tactician, Stu Bannatyne, skipper George Sakellaris and overseeing the sail program.

Doyle said, “There was a constant analysis and dialog onboard as the position of the Stream was fluid, and the weather pattern was also shifting. We had to hunt to find the (Gulf) Stream… we never found the 4 knot real road to Bermuda. It had broken up before we got there. Forecasters had predicted it might, but they suggested we might get there before it would start to dismember. The Stream was really breaking up pretty quick.”

Shockwave Coming in to the Finish Monday Morning. PHOTO CREDIT: Barry Pickthall/PPL

Shockwave Coming in to the Finish Monday Morning. PHOTO CREDIT: Barry Pickthall/PPL

“We tried some new ideas and ways to optimize the boat for the ORR rule” explained Doyle. “Bella Mente is a more powerful reaching boat than Shockwave so in order to defend our 2012 victory we felt we needed to improve our rating as we did not feel we could beat her in a reaching drag race which the Bermuda Race can often be. After a detailed weather analysis of the past 10 races over a 20 year period we made the decision to switch to a fractional spinnaker hoist. We designed and built a new full size Fractional Code 0 (labeled Super-FRO by the crew) to complement our existing smaller FRO. We only carried one free-flying spinnaker and then two Fractional Code 0′s.”   Both FROs were set on top down-furlers for easy sail handling and crossovers. The combination proved successful, as the powerful “Super FRO” carried the boat through some crucial transitions.  ”Surprisingly its best moment came when VMG running in 8 knots TWS into head seas with Bella Mente right on our tail. Even though she was carrying a full size mast head spinnaker we were able to open up on her with the more stable Super FRO.”

Doyle CFD worked on the analysis to ensure the corner loading was in line with the boat

Doyle CFD ‘s analysis was critical to ensuring the Super FRO’s success onboard Shockwave

“We had one day of practice with the Super FRO, during which we saw what a powerful weapon it could be, but also how much it really loaded up the sprit. We had Doyle’s CFD team working with Reichel/Pugh’s office to re-engineer the sprit to handle the sail, and the guys were reinforcing the sprit until 3am the morning of the start!  A total team effort to pull off this incredible result again.”

The win adds to Shockwave’s growing list of recent victories, highlighted by their division win in the 2012 Newport-Bermuda Race, the 2013 Montego Bay, and the 2014 RORC Caribbean 600 Race. Originally launched in 2008 as Alpha Romero 3, Shockwave has proven to be a dominant force in the last 3 years.  Doyle Sailmakers has been intimately involved in the boats resurgence, helping optimize not only the sail program, but also the mast and keel for a full aero and hydrodynamic package.

For more information on the Newport-Bermuda Race, please visit here.

Results from this years race can be found here.

 

Robbie Doyle on the Bermuda Race: Strategy, Sails, & Crew Care

Robbie Doyle will start his 12th Newport Bermuda Race when the fleet leaves Newport on June 20th.  He is what he calls the “stratitician” on board George Sakellaris’ Shockwave, 2012 winner of the Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Trophy and the North Rock Beacon Trophy as top IRC boat in the race. We caught up with Robbie at the Doyle sail loft in Salem, Mass.

Bermuda Race Prize giving at Government House presented by His Excellency Mr George Fergusson, the Governor of Bermuda. Shockwave – Robbie Doyle – George W Mixter Trophy Gibbs Hill navigator. Photo by Barry Pickthall


Q.  To get an edge on the competition, what should competitors, navigators, or tacticians be doing now to get prepared for the race in mid-June?

For all competitors, right now you should be reviewing the weather from past races and watching the Gulf Stream and surrounding eddies. Begin to get a feel for what to expect in terms of weather and determine how the Gulf Stream is setting up and moving. Don’t wait until two days before the race to do this. The Gulf Stream and accompanying meanders and eddies play a key role in the race so you need to know where all the key elements will be when you get there, not just at the start.

Q. As well as watching the Gulf Stream, how important are weather patterns and forecasts and why?

My first Newport Bermuda Race was 38 years ago and we relied on celestial navigation, and much of the weather was predicted by the navigator’s arthritis. The prevailing strategy was what emerged from past races. It was basically thought that you head 180 degrees until you get into the Gulf Stream, and then head for Bermuda.  Along with everything else, weather forecasting has gotten a lot more accurate but you still cannot trust the forecast 100 percent.

On Shockwave we are preparing with the goal of winning it.  So, currently, we are doing a study on weather data over the decades and we are basing our analysis on a number of factors.  The reason the weather predictions are so important is that we will decide on our sail inventory from our analysis. If we choose wrongly, or if I advise wrongly, that does not give me a warm, fuzzy feeling. These decisions of what sails to bring and what sails to leave behind are a huge factor in preparing for the race and can determine a great deal. We need to submit our rating by May 22 so most key decisions must be made by then.  We will make our macro inventory decisions then but exactly which sails come and go will be decided the day of the race. Despite all the technology we have, you never win the Newport Bermuda Race if you don’t make some big guesses and that is all part of what it takes to win the race.

 Q. Are there some factors that many competitors could take greater notice of as they consider their competitive strategy?

Yes, and it is about sail inventory. Read the ORR rules again or talk to your local sailmaker.  The rules have a clear effect on the sail inventory because with ORR rules you are rated with the spinnaker factored into your rating whether you choose to use one or not. You are rated based upon the minimum ORR area whether your actual spinnaker is that size or not.  If your spinnaker is larger than the ORR area your rating goes up, but not vice versa. Some teams will have a spinnaker on the boat that may be well under what you are rated for.  Similarly, you are charged for a minimum jib area and a cruising boat with a non-overlapping genoa is likely to be under that for jib area. It is very easy to miss these details and you should take time right now to figure out your sail inventory to your best advantage.

 Q.  What are some common pitfalls for competitors?

You want to make sure you establish your watch system immediately and stick to it from the start. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to get into a rhythm and stay rested.  People tend to want to stay engaged or participating in the decisions even when they are off watch -but it is better to preserve your energy. You will need it.  Another pitfall is that you don’t rest on your laurels after you pass through the Gulf Stream. As a rule the sea state is calmer but people are tired and it is very easy to stop thinking strategically.  There remain a lot of tricky currents and decisions made in the final 200 miles of the race where it can be won or lost.

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Seen here after the 2012 Bermuda Race, the R/P 72 Shockwave recently was overall winner of the 2014 Caribbean 600. Photo by John Rousmaniere

Q. What else have you learned about the Bermuda Race?

The more I learn about the race and the more I know, the less confident I have become about winning it. The Newport Bermuda Race is one of the most challenging races of all time. You have the Gulf Stream, with hot and cold air meeting each other. It is an oceanographic and meteorological laboratory and we are the RATS! It is really, really tricky. It is always interesting, challenging, and rewarding to take part in.

- See more at: http://bermudarace.com/robbie-doyle-bermuda-race-strategy-sail-selection-crew-care/

- Written by Laurie Fullerton

Doyle Sails Dominate the Beneteau Classes in the San Diego NOOD Regatta

Perfect conditions 10-15kts and warm and sunny weather provided a great weekend of sailing in San Diego for the annual NOOD Regatta.

Mark Stratton and his Crew on the Beneteau-40.7 Laguno won all 6 races in the 40.7 class to take the win. Laguno used a complete set of Doyle Stratis ICE sails for the event including a New ICE Mainsail and ICE LM #1. All of the sails were made by Doyle Chicago, with John Baxter onboard to celebrate his birthday on Sunday with the clean sweep.

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New Stratis ICE Mainsail aboard Laguno.

New Stratis ICE Genoa aboard Lauguno.

New Stratis ICE Genoa aboard Laguno.

Bill Purdy and his Whirlwind Team made the trip to San Diego from the east coast. Bill chartered a Beneteau 36.7 and brought his Doyle sails out for the event. Bill used a brand New Doyle Stratis #1 made by Mark Ploch in at Doyle City Island. Bill also won every race in the event in the 9 boat Beneteau 36.7 Division.

Congratulations to both teams who sailed a fantastic regatta.

KGB Wins Etchells Mid-Winters; Raging Rooster Clinches Overall Jaguar Cup Win.

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KGB Sailing at the 2014 Jaguar Cup

KGB Sailing at the 2014 Jaguar Cup

Congratulations to Senet Bischoff and his team of Benjamin Kinney and Clay Bischoff, for winning the 2014 Jaguar Mid-Winters, the fourth and final regatta of the 2014 Jaguar Series.  KGB had top six finishes in all but two of the seven races sailed over the three days in Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL. The most impressive part of this victory is the team was comprised of all Corinthian sailors competing against many of the top professional teams worldwide.

“In the past, Ben and I treated this as a social endeavor,” admitted Bischoff. “We always sailed with a bunch of friends, and had a great time, but we never had a consistent third crew. This year we added my brother Clay, a two time team race world champion and former college sailor of the year, and it’s been huge.”

“We are an all Corinthian (amateur) team so we don’t come in early to practice. We did buy a new set of Doyle sails from Jud Smith, and that has been a big help. Jud is very open and honest in helping us get better. We can send him a photo of our sails and he will respond immediately with tuning advice.”

The Fleet at the 2014 Etchells Mid-Winter Championships.  John Payne Photo.

The Fleet at the 2014 Etchells Mid-Winter Championships. John Payne Photo.

Raging Rooster Overall Win

2014 Jaguar Cup Champions Peter Duncan, Jud Smith and Tom Blackwell. Photo Credit: Larry Suter.

The Mid-Winters concluded the 2014 Jaguar Series and a second congratulations is in order for Peter Duncan and his team, Jud Smith and Tom Blackwell, for winning the 2014 Jaguar Cup after finishing 4th at the Mid-Winters this past weekend! Both teams utilized the new Doyle APG Main, NLM-5 Jib and VMG Spinnaker.

“The Jag”, as it has come to be known, is a four regatta series, spread out over four weekends between December and March, and brings together many of the best Etchells sailors in the world. Hosted by Biscayne Bay Yacht Club and Etchells Fleet 20, the series consistently draws fifty or more boats to the good weather and great competition on Biscayne Bay. Teams from USA, Canada, Bermuda, Great Britain, Ireland, Switzerland and Ukraine are preparing for the World Championships to be held in Newport, RI this June.

To learn more about Doyle’s Etchells’ Sails, please visit here.

To see full regatta results, please visit here.

To read the full regatta re-cap, please visit here.

Stratis ICE Nominated for DAME Award

Stratis ICE FIberDoyle Sailmakers is proud to announce that Stratis ICE has been nominated by the jury for the DAME Awards 2013.  Overall winners are announced on the first morning of METS (Marine Equipment Trade Show), November 19th. Doyle Sailmakers will have a team  exhibiting in the Superyacht Pavilion at Stand 10.715 , with samples of ICE as well as other materials from their product range.

The DAME is a prestigious competition for new marine equipment and accessories that is awarded based on overall design, build quality, functionality, and use of materials. To win the DAME is the ultimate accolade for companies and innovators, and all the nominations for the award are seen as trendsetters for the next generation of product development.

Stratis ICE is an entirely new and unique Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) sail fiber that is a game-changing product for the sailing market. In summary it is lighter, more durable and stronger than any other sail fiber available.  ICE is unique in that it is the first truly new fiber to be introduced to sailmaking in recent years; other traditional advances in sail technology have simply been a new application of existing fibers.

ICE provides weight reductions and elongation numbers equivalent to a sail made with 100 per cent standard modulus carbon, but without the durability issues that come with high carbon content laminates.

This flat ribbon fiber was originally used by the US military and Doyle Sails has secured the marine rights to the product and spent 4 years developing special adhesives and application techniques to turn this extraordinary fiber into a durable sail material. The fiber is ideal for use in the sail market as it exhibits very low stretch and creep, yet is lightweight, highly durable, and resistant to UV and salt.

Results for ICE have shown the highest resistance to flex fatigue of any sail product, with ICE sails retaining their initial shape and speed longer than any other sail membrane. This allows the Doyle design team to engineer sails much closer to their work load, and avoid over-engineering them in anticipation of future flex fatigue. Overall this makes ICE the first realistic alternative to carbon in performance racing sails.

Doyle primarily developed ICE to improve performance of superyacht sails. As superyacht sails got heavier and with higher loads – especially on yachts over 50m in length – the corners of the sail and the actual sail laminate needed to be very thick and heavy in order to be able to take the load of the sail. Use of the flat ICE fiber makes sails lighter and thinner, avoiding the heavy contour and texture in the membrane and eliminating the thick corner laminate that results from traditional membrane sails.

Although ICE offers so many benefits, the challenge for the sailmaker is that it is extremely slippery fiber and therefore very complex and difficult to work with: after a long development process Doyle has mastered the production technique required to use it. Prior to undergoing the standard Stratis lamination and laying process (unique and award-winning in its own right) the fiber is treated to make it workable; Doyle had to develop special polymers with low melt points in order to be able to laminate the fiber.

To learn more about Stratis ICE, please visit here.