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Archive for the ‘One Design’ Category

Relative Obscurity Wins J/70 World Championship

Relative Obscurity 2017 J/70 Worlds

The 2017 J/70 World Championship was one the largest and most competitive One Design regattas of the year, with 161 boats racing haling from 24 different countries.  With many of the top sailors in the world competing, the racing was incredibly close throughout the regatta hosted by the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda in Porto Cervo, Sardinia.  After the racing had concluded, it was American Peter Duncan, sailing with Doyle’s own Jud Smith, Victor Diaz de Leon and Willem van Waay, that came away with the victory. Over the course of six races, the team never placed worst than third and won three races, finishing with a 15 point margin over runner-up Brian Keane (USA).

Relative Obscurity 2017 Worlds_2“Awesome! Top of the world!” exclaimed Peter Duncan dockside at the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda. “It is a great feeling, I have sailed with some great guys, we had a great event, and everything seemed to go our way, it was just one of those weeks. It is hard to put into words how I feel like now, but this was just exceptional. This fleet has some really great talent, and the organizers, and the yacht club have done such an amazing job. Most of all I want to credit the crew, Victor, Jud, Willem, have been just fantastic.”

With numerous General Recalls, Black Flag in play, and a full on foam up. The Audi J/70 World Championship had a thrilling climax to remember for years to come. With sparkling sunshine, a significant sea state, and a warm westerly breeze, piping up to a ballistic 30 knots, the world’s largest championship sportsboat fleet enjoyed a fantastic finale.

Relative Obscurity 2017 Worlds_5The team on Relative Obscurity has sailed together for most of 2017, and worked hard in preparation earlier this year.  In 2017, the team has won the J/70 Italian Nationals, Newport Regatta, and Bacardi Miami Sailing Week, in addition to taking third at the J/70 European Championships.  Jud Smith, head of Doyle One Design, has been intimately involved with the team, and for the World’s the team was using Doyle latest J/70 Class Sails: M2 Cross Cut Main, J6R Bi-Radial Jib and AP Class Spinnaker.

To learn more about Doyle’s J/70 Sails, please visit here.

For Complete Regatta Results, please visit here.

 

Doyle Grey and J70 Italian Nationals Win

Although award announcers proclaimed an “unexpected outcome” for US J70 team, Relative Obscurity, at this past weekend’s 55 boat Italian Nationals, Doyle Sailmakers was not surprised. The scratch sheet was chalk full of competitive teams, including most of the top teams from the San Francisco Worlds and top teams of Europe and South America, but Peter Duncan and his team chipped away each of day in perfect racing conditions of 6-14 knots for the win. They were easy to spot, championing Doyle Grey sails amidst a sea of white.

Doyle Grey amidst a sea of white

The reasoning behind Doyle’s new grey sails is mostly a need for a faster, stronger headsail for the J70. The J70 is a one design class limited to one jib to be used for the entire wind range, from 1 to 30+ knots. We approached Dimension Polyant in hopes of creating the best performing and most durable radial jib cloth, and are extremely pleased with the results. The grey finish has the absolute lowest stretch of any woven radial polyester cloth available. This cloth is strong, not only in the warp, but in every direction, similar to a premium laminate. With the ambition of reducing stretch, we also wanted to distinguish our sails, not just in results, but also in a color that is physically easier on the eyes.

No Stretch Grey Finish Doyle Jib

Doyle One Design does not cut corners and puts the needs of our customers first.  We know that J70 jibs take a beating and decided to go stronger, creating a fabric that will last a season of hard use in all conditions, without compromising shape. That is why we only offer one jib design that will perform in any location or condition. The J70 Doyle J6 jib design is the same one which previously won San Diego North Americans and assisted podium finishes at the San Francisco Worlds and UK Europeans.  We developed a high clew for in-hauling to ten degrees from the get-go, while our competitors are just catching on.

Doyle Grey J70 sails winning Newport Regatta against US teams

Our J70 Main design has similarly been ahead of the learning curve, keeping it simple with a cross cut main from the beginning. Since the 2015 La Rachelle Worlds, our M2 main design has had proven results, with a few construction and shape refinements. The Doyle J70 main has reduced mast bend and less luff curve, which allows the mast to support the headstay better in high wind speeds. In this regard, our main design compliments our jib design and is also currently being produced with a durable Doyle Grey finish. Our J70 sails are results driven, but after seeing some pictures; we are excited the Doyle Grey is also aesthetically pleasing.

Peter Duncan won Newport Regatta with Doyle Grey sails

 

J70 Italian Nationals Results

Doyle J70 One Design Page

Doyle J70 Order Form

Relative Obscurity Rules J70 Class at Bacardi Miami Race Week

Peter Duncan, with Relative Obscurity crew consisting of Moose McClintock, Willem van Waay, and Victor Diaz DeLeon, won the J70 class at the 2017 Bacardi Miami Sailing week, with a six point lead and two bullets. Peter told us they elected to race the event with previously used upwind sails, thinking it would be too light to put on a crisp new jib. (It did end up being below planing conditions in the 5-9 range in all but the last race.) They were pleased at how clean the competition was with the 2nd and 3rd place boats; despite how tough and close the racing was during the event. Victor said, “We focused on being conservative throughout the regatta because we thought we had a speed edge. We emphasized having good starts in low density areas to get out clean and have options.” In his usual way, he wrapped up with a sociological overview, “With the different ages and personalities on board, our team has a good mix of wisdom, experience, athleticism and spunk.”

On-board Relative Obscurity high-res pro spunk selfie

Each member of the team unanimously agreed that their downwind speed was excellent and it was mentioned that it saved them from some potentially tough beats by allowing them to be near the leaders at the leeward gates. Willem, who was part of teams placing 2,1,2 in the last three World’s, had high praise for the latest spinnaker design, “I knew that the upwind sails were very fast from sailing next to the Doyle boats over the last 2 years, but I wasn’t sure about how the kite would fair. I have to say, I was very pleasantly surprised to find out that the kite was a rocket in all conditions. In practice, we had an edge in the planing conditions, and in the regatta, we had an edge in displacement. The kite was very easy to trim and I could feel from the beginning that it had excellent pull and power through the range. With other coaches videoing us, it didn’t go unnoticed.  Our technique and communication was great, but something was also special about that kite: Looking forward to sailing more with it.”

Duncan sporting Grey Doyle Main & new jib on Practice Day

For those of you in the J70 circuit this winter, you may have noticed a few grey sails on the race course, including on Peter Duncan’s Relative Obscurity. Jud Smith, our head of One Design, headed up this initiative, saying, “After extensive development work, we are pleased with the results of the new Grey finished Dacron.  While the look is certainly different, it’s not just a dye, but an improved resin finishing process designed to produce a firmer cloth that will hold its shape longer and through a greater wind range, and further increases the durability of the core fibers in the cloth.  Particularly for One Design classes that relay on a smaller number of sails, having a lightweight sail that meets the class rules but also holds its shape better is a real advantage.” Both the Doyle main and the jib are now produced out of this improved fabric. The Doyle main design was developed as cross cut and has remained so from the outset, being found superior to our competitors’ radial designs. Though others are finally catching on, we know our years of experience perfecting this layout will allow our customers to continue to shine.

Bacardi Race Results

Doyle J70 Sails

Doyle J70 Tuning Guide

Feel free to contact our head of One Design:

Jud Smith: jsmith@doylesails.com

Mendelblatt/Liljedahl win Bacardi Star Class, powered by Doyle

With nearly 70 boats on the line, the Star class was likely the most competitive at Bacardi Miami Race Week. Doyle One Design is very excited to have had sails on the winning boat.

Mark Mendelblatt and Magnus Liljedahl won the Star class. It was Mark’s third time winning the event in his hometown as a skipper and Magnus’s sixth time winning as a crew. They were excited with their win, despite a lack of breeze and a general recall barring racing on the last day. They managed to beat Xavier Rohart and Pierre-Alexis Ponsot, who are leading the Star Sailors League ranking.  Mark was using Doyle’s M14+ Main, most days the J6R jib and two of the days, the J8C jib. He did not buy a new set for Bacardi, but instead used the same set that won him the Star Sailors League 2016 Finals in Nassau, Bahamas.

Mark Mendelblatt between races at Bacardi Miami Race Week 2017

Mark Mendelblatt & Magnus Liljedahl win Star Class at 2017 Bacardi

Doyle Star Sails

Bacardi Race Results

Do not hesitate to contact our One Design department to discuss Star sails at onedesign@doylesails.com. Tomas Hornos or Jud Smith would be happy to assist you. Don’t forget we have designed and tested a main version for the new Burton mast, as well.

1,2 at Star Schoonmaker Cup

Mark Mendalblatt and Brian Fatih: 1st at 2016 Schoonmaker Cup

Doyle would like to congratulate our customers Mark Mendalblatt/Brian Fatih and Paul Cayard/Josh Revkin on finishing first and second place respectively at the Schoonmaker Cup this past weekend in Miami. This is part one of five of the Star Winter Series and was attended by 24 teams. Doyle Star sails are designed and produced at our loft in Salem, MA.

Scuttlebutt Article: Schoonmaker Cup

Schoonmaker Cup Yachtscoring Results

A few more days of our 10% Discount: Order Form

Doyle Star Sail Descriptions

A History of Proven Doyle Star Sail Results

Schoonmaker Cup Awards: 1st place Mendalblatt/Fatih

Schoonmaker Cup Awards: 2nd place Cayard/Revkin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Half of Star North American’s top ten powered by Doyle

The 2016 edition of the Star Class North American Championship was held at Chicago Yacht Club. Despite an early seasons change occurring this fall, the organizers and volunteers put on a solid event. Although the tune up regatta was light, the primary event was overall a breezy one, with the second race abandoned and the second day called off for the day. Despite beginning the third day with an inability to anchor the RC boat, the organized found a window late in the day to get two races off. Only the final day brought medium breeze in race four and a light air race five ending in drifting conditions.
Chicago Yacht Club Race Committee in tricky conditions
Doyle was excited to have five boats in the top ten. Our sails have consistently had upwind speed in heavy air, which was showcased by early regatta favorite and concluding winner, Melleby/Revkin. Doyle currently offers two varieties of jibs. The J6R, which Melleby was using, is a great uprange jib. Its cloth held up well and the radial panel layout allows for no stretch or extra fullness, reminding us of why the J6R is so successful in medium to heavy air conditions. Anosov/Caesar, third place finishers, used both the J6R and J8C, which gave him good range and power for the extreme wave conditions. Both sails use a Dimension Polyant square weave cloth, which can clearly take a beating, making either jib ideal for long events or use in multiple regattas.
Melleby/Revkin 8177 and Hornos/Baltins 8367
Doyle recently updated the luff curve on our mains (M14+ and M14R), which was noticed by fifth place finisher, Will Swigart. His radial main allowed him and crew, Brian Fatih, to have good beats and perform well. The biggest story of this event, however, was the use of the new Burton mast by both Melleny and Anosov. Anosov had previously won the 2016 District 1 Championship with this stiffer mast. It became clear before that event that mainsail development would be needed to match the increased stiffness of the Burton. Anosov used the M5B design. Since then, he and Doyle’s Jud Smith have been the leaders for main development.
Winners of Star North Americans (Melleby/Revkin)

After sailing with the new mast, using various mains, and analyzing photos, Jud has come up with a suitable main for the Burton mast, versus the standard Emmetti. Melleby used M11B and Anasov used M5B, which can tolerate a firmer leech and a more open top batten compared to M14+ on a stiffer mast. The speed of both Anosov and Melleby at North Americans is a promising first sign of this new mast design and complimenting Doyle main design. Going forward, Doyle Sails will continue to work with Arthur Anosov, Josh Revkin, and Rob Burton to produce quality sails for both Emmetti and Burton spars.

 Contact Doyle One Design’s Tomas Hornos for more information
Loft: 978-740-5950
onedesign@doylesails.com

Doyle Podium Finish at J70 Worlds

Jud Smith brought a new team together for the Rolex Big Boat Series, hosted by Saint Francis Yacht Club, serving as the only opportunity for Africa to get up to speed on bay conditions in San Francisco prior to the Worlds, a far cry from East Coast conditions.  This team consisted of Victor Diaz (tactician), Alec Anderson (trimmer), and Ed Wright (strategist.) Racing at 730 pounds (not particularly heavy relative to other teams), they finished fourth in the big boat series and went on to get a podium finish of third in the Worlds, scoring more first place finishes than any other boat.

For this windy event, Jud used the same jib design, Doyle J6R, which won him the light air San Diego North Americans. This design has always had a much higher clew, which allows for more effective inhauling and a longer foot (since all the girth measurement points move closer to the head.) Inhauling assists with pointing and improves the effective performance range of the one and only jib. We use Dimension ProRadial HTP, as it has the lowest stretch and can handle the abuse of constantly furling and flogging during starts and wind shots.

Our Doyle M2 CrossCut mainsail sets up on a straighter mast than the competition. We target no more than 3 cm of pre-bend at the base setting for 10 to 11 knots of wind. Although Doyle sails are considered fast in lighter conditions, Africa won the heaviest air race during the Worlds by a big margin. Our upwind sails are built from heavier, lower stretch, more durable fabric. We added luff curve to our main prior to Rolex to improve the heavy air performance without compromising our light air speed.

This summer, we developed the AIRX 650 Spinnaker we used at Worlds. We found this design had more power all the time, from soaking to full planing conditions. Our speed advantage has generally been upwind, but we now have an edge downwind, which did not go unnoticed. The kite allowed the team to improve their downwind planing technique each day, knowing the difference between a good run and a bad one can change the outcome of a regatta in just one leg.

Africa downwind at Worlds 2016Learning to sail the boat flatter upwind and depower just enough to accelerate again after a nasty set of waves took some getting used to. Every beat of the Rolex series, the team did a better job of steering and trimming to maintain that mode and accelerate in waves without heeling too much. At the top of the wind range, they tensioned the rig to the highest setting with tighter lowers, allowing use of the backstay without washing out the main. Doyle refined our rig setting protocol to a 2:1 ration of turns above base. Considering numerous poor starts, Jud became very confident in their speed, as they were forced to sail back ‘from the dead’ in bad air and skinny lanes.

Transitioning from the big boat series to the Worlds, the size of the fleet doubled and the new PRO, Mark Foster, was using a midline boat. It quickly became clear on the practice day that the committee was prepared to identify as many OCS boats as they could. Therefore, Africa took conservative and cautious pings with their Velocitek and would check their pings by running the line. Jud believes some teams are not careful enough with how they ping the line.

The first two days of the Worlds, the wind was strong enough to get racing off on time.  The earlier races as the wind was filling in were the most challenging.  During the morning races, the middle and left side could fill in first and the breeze could wobble left or right.  Not only were there patches of pressure, but there were big holes downwind that were deadly if caught in one.   The heavier air afternoon races were more straight forward starting and speed contests, and the faster boats found their way to the top of the fleet by the end of the race.  The afternoon races were generally in the ebb and got thrashy with short steep waves, much as we saw in Rolex regatta. Africa performed best in this condition relative to other teams, and it showed as they led the regatta for the first two days.  Even after the first 5 races, the top five boats were very close in the standings.

The third day was the most challenging, featuring very erratic wind and pressure, since the wind took much longer to fill in during the afternoon.   Even then, the wind did not fill down into the right side of the course.This is the day that decided the regatta.  Several of the top boats including Africa, got caught in much lighter air on the run by gybing early.   Africa and Petite Terrible got caught on wrong side of run in race 9. Flojito got caught in that light air side on the run of race 10.  Catapult stayed on the train downwind in those races and ground back to have all top 10 finishes in those challenging races 8, 9 and 10.  Finally, during race ten, conditions became fresher as the wind filled in and Africa managed another first.

Going into the final day, Africa was in 4th, knowing they needed two good races for a chance at a podium finish. They had a good start, sailed all the way out on Starboard tack to stay ahead of Calvi Network (who was within striking distance.) Flojito and Catapult went right, and although leading their side, Africa led that first beat and remained in first during race 11, bumping them up in the standings. The final race had breeze, but the standings remained the same as the top five boats in the race were the top five boats in the standings.

For Doyle, we were very pleased with a podium finish, Africa having improved their heavy air technique and speed significantly. It is obvious Africa is no longer considered a ‘light air flyer.’ Doyle sails and our recommended set up are fast in all conditions upwind and downwind, which didn’t go unnoticed. Jud is very pleased they had the chance to compete at that level and is now looking forward to sharing lessons learned with the J70 fleet in preparation for the 2017 season and the 2018 World Championship in his hometown of Marblehead, MA.

Doyle J70 Sail Descriptions

J70 Order Form

Doyle J70 Race Results

Doyle J70 Tuning Guide & Matrix