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Archive for the ‘Racing’ Category

Relative Obscurity Top American J/70 at KWRW

Relative Obscurity  ( Allen Clark / Photo Boat )

A windy and cool Key West Race Week wrapped up last week, with 48 boats racing in the J/70 class. At Doyle Sailmakers, we were very pleased with two boats in the top ten and Peter Duncan’s Relative Obscurity clinching second place to be the top American finisher. We were able to have a conversation with Peter after the event for his perspective on the event. Peter was quick to note the merits of his exceptional team of multiple world champion winners Moose McClintock and Karl Anderson, as well as North American Champion Victor Diaz. They were sailing in the range of 730-740 pounds, which Peter finds to be a comfortable weight in all conditions, but particularly in waves where having weight on the rail is important.

While Duncan primarily campaigns his Etchells, the transition to the J/70 has been a good one, and Relative Obscurity was 7th at the 2015 Worlds in La Rochelle, France. While the Key West fleet was still smaller than Worlds, the top end of the fleet was still incredibly competitive with the top three finishers at World’s competing against each other again.

Relative Obscurity

Comparing the two events, Duncan noted Key West was breezier, with much bumpier seas, so they had to work to keep the boat powered up more.  Because of other commitments, and the weather just prior to the regatta, the preparation was condensed and forced the team to make sure the boat was well prepared so there were no hiccups in the event.  Each day of the event, Relative Obscurity was able to do a couple of hours of two boat tuning with my team on Africa. Both boats were using Doyle Cross Cut Class Main, Pro Radial Jibs and VMG Spinnakers for the regatta.  We were able to test not only tuning for the conditions and weight placement, but also learn a lot about the course with five minute split tacks and split gybes on each side of the race track.

The team primarily relied on Commanders for weather and forecasting, which the race committee kept heavy tabs on as well and Duncan found to be very good throughout the week.

Starts were extremely important with such a large fleet on a short starting line. I asked Duncan about his regatta and starting strategy. At first, they were tentative, but they switched to a more aggressive mode and ended up over the line early twice. On one occasion, they were able to come back and win the race, whereas the other OCS was more difficult to dig out of and they placed 21st, their throw out. These made them more conservative, trying to attack the line without pushing it too hard. They tended towards the favored end of the line, but prioritized less crowded areas. Peter figures they sailed the first weather beat fairly conservatively, never really losing contact with the fleet. Their results were very consistent in this competitive fleet, which they achieved by getting to the edges, without ever going for anything really extraordinary. Each crew member clicked into a specific role on the boat, with McClintock in charge of overall strategy, Diaz calling boat to boat tactics, and Anderson keeping his head in the boat for tuning and sail trim.

Moose McClintock, who has now sailed with a number of different J70 programs, had some interesting

Relative Obscurity ( Allen Clark / Photo Boat)

observations regarding the Jib in particular. “I was impressed with the ease of using the sails.  I prefer pull and go so I can keep my head out of the boat and I think you achieve this in your designs.  I think we learned a lot about the inhaul use on the Pro radial Jib over the course of the week, having Victor aboard was critical for us as he used the same inhaul technique on the Jib that you used at North Americans.  He did say after sailing Friday that the inhaul was the key on Friday as he ended up with the same jib sheet setting and played the inhaul depending on how much power he needed, mostly a different way to get to the same end.   Eye opening for me.”

With fast upwind and downwind speed and an obviously harmonious team, Peter is planning to do Bacardi Cup, North Americans in Texas, Europeans in Germany, and Worlds in San Francisco, hopefully with a similar team depending on everyone’s schedule.

KWRW Results

Relative Obscurity ( Allen Clark / Photo Boat )

La Tormenta wins the Etchells Sid Doren

In the Etchells class, the Sidney Doren Memorial Regatta took place January 9-10,2016, hosted by Biscayne Bay Yacht Club. Shannon Bush, sailing with Brad Boston and Curt Oetking on La Tormenta, came out on top with a ten point lead. The three have been racing together for the past three years, and Boston believes they work really well together and most importantly, are able to have a lot of fun which allows for enjoyable regattas.  The team has had good events in the past and won smaller events, but this was the first major event they won together. Shannon and her team are always trying to climb the ladder and be faster, which seemed to click this regatta.

Catching up with Brad after the regatta, he explained that their regatta strategy was to capitalize on their boat speed, which Brad claims is incredible. Therefore, they would prioritize a big hole at the start, while trying to be as close to the favored end as possible while avoiding traffic.  The Midline boat worked well for La Tormenta and they started there in 3 out of the 4 races such that they seemed to be able to do as they pleased off the line for the first few minutes. Consistency is always a key factor and Brad figures they were able to pull that off by letting their speed get them out of any bad positions and by staying relaxed. The team would get away from the fleet and slowly pick their way through with clear air and clean lanes.  To accomplish this speed, they used Doyle’s AP-2 Main, VMG bi-radial spinnaker, and alternated between the Marblehead Light Jib (MHL) in lower velocity conditions until two people were on the deck, when they switched to the DCM Jib to hold for the remainder of the time.

Doyle Etchells Miami 2016When to change sails and settings had been the focus of the last several regattas and during the practice time prior to the Sid Doren. La Tormenta tuned up against Peter Duncan and Jud Smith’s team on Raging Rooster, and they both received some help from Moose McClintock on a powerboat. For weather models and forecasting, the team depended on Commanders, Wind Finder, and Sail Flow. Although the models were all slightly different, there was agreement that the wind would trend right, so they were sure to protect the right, especially when dark clouds came in.

We also asked Brad how his success as a five-time Viper 640 North American Champion translated into the Etchells Class. Aside from being accustomed to racing in large fleets, Brad insisted that it was the absolute inverse. The Etchells is a highly technical boat, which doesn’t have huge speed changes like a sport boat might, so every little thing matters. It is one of Brad’s favorite fleets to race in because the skills he learns from racing Etchells in speed and tuning carry over to all other one design classes. Congratulations La Tormenta on a great win on Biscayne Bay.

Full results can be found here.

For more information about Doyle’s Etchells Sails, please visit here.

Ragamuffin 100 2nd Across Line in Rolex Sydney Hobart

Ragamuffin 5In one of the most challenging editions of the Rolex Sydney Hobart Race in recent years, the 100 foot Maxi Ragamuffin 100 overcame several early stumbles for a thrilling finish in the veritable race.  This year’s event saw a wide range of conditions, with high winds that led to nearly a third of the fleet retiring, and light winds at the finish that tested sailors patience.  Ultimately, Ragamuffin 100 passed Rambler 88 in the final mile of the race to take second across the line in light winds that stood in stark contrast to the early part of the race.  Ragamuffin 100 had Mark Fullerton of Doyle Sails Qingdao sailing aboard, and the boat was sailing with a full Doyle Stratis sail inventory.  Most impressively, the massive Square Top main was first fitted on the original Ragamuffin 100 in 2013, stayed with the boat as a new hull was built for the rig and deck, and has now powered the yacht to 3 Sydney Hobart Races, 2  Transpacs and set the record in the 673 mild Hong Kong to Vietnam Race.

The first night of the race was the most intense, with a 40 knot front blowing through the fleet in the dark of night with intense rain completely reducing visibility. In the process of changing sails for the breeze, the massive furled A3 came partially unfurled forcing the yacht to bear away to try to get the 9,000 square foot sail back on deck while running downwind with a full main and J4 at 20 knots, into the swell.  After getting the foredeck under control, the yacht began reefing, only to have the reefing line for the second reef break.  In the chaos that ensued going for the 3rd reef, the yacht crash tacked, with the keel and water ballast now to leeward.  Ragamuffin 2

Skipper David Witt was thrown off the back of the boat in the process, only hanging on to the back but unable to help get the boat righted.

“It was 10 to 10.30 at night when the southerly hit. It was intense and relentless. We were trying to get the main down heading north when the boat literally capsized on top of us. Shave (Justin Shave) was on the bow and under water, the main, half down, knocked me off the back of the boat. I was hanging on to the back end and my sea boots were dragged off me.

“All I was thinking was, ‘can someone press the canting button (to centralise the keel), cos I can’t reach it from where I am’.  We were under water for 15 minutes – the ballast was on the wrong side of the boat and so was the keel. Frightening doesn’t describe it,” Witt recalled.

Ragamuffin 3While the team lost some miles in the process, they were able to continue while two of their main rivals, Wild Oats XI (R/P 100) and Perpetual Loyal (Juan K 100) were forced to retire with damage.  There was more drama to come, as one of Ragamuffin 100’s daggerboards broke, forcing the team to “tack” the intact daggerboard, no easy feat with an 19 foot, 650 pound board.  But in the end, the boat kept going and began reeling in the miles they had lost, and had the perseverance to pass Rambler 88 right at the finish.  In contrast to the earlier parts of the race, the final day saw nearly any wind.  “We never give up on this boat … we managed to get them in the end,” Witt said.

The race was also an achievement for owner and sailing legend Syd Fischer, who at 88 years old was was the oldest competitor to ever sail the Sydney-Hobart Race.  “It was good to beat them – a good feeling. And I crossed another one off – my 47th,” said Fischer upon finishing.

Ragamuffin 6 (Old Hull)

Same Main, Different Hull – Ragamuffin 100 (version 1) racing in the 2013 Sydney Hobart.

Mark Fullerton, of Doyle Sails Qingdao, has worked with the Ragamuffin team for years and managed their sail program.  The Ragamuffin sails were produced at Doyle Qingdao, which is owned and operated by sailors John Hearne and Fullerton.  Looking back on the race, Fullerton was impressed by how well the original main is still holding up.  “Everyone on board couldn’t believe how it survived the first night. I have no idea how and why the rig didn’t come down. It was about as messed up as you could get things. There were no broken battens or any damage to  the main.  As the race went on and we pulled the reefs out I was amazed to see there was no damage to the mainsail. No more than a few minor bits of chafe” Fullerton commented.  The main is a light weight, Stratis Carbon/Technora main that was fitted prior the 2013 Transpac Race, and has now been with the same rig after a new underbody was produced for the boat in 2013 and mated with the original Deck and Rig.  Having now powered the yacht through thousands of offshore miles racing, the sail is a testament to the performance, durability and light weight of the Stratis sails that are being utilized on many of the world’s highest performing yachts.

For complete results, please visit here

To learn more about Doyle Stratis Sails, please visit here

Jackpot Wins Viper North Americans for 5th time

The 2015 Viper North Americans, held in Larchmont, NY, was not only the largest Viper regatta to date but also the largest sport boat competition in North America to date. With 53 boats, this four day event was extremely competitive with a good mixture of conditions – light the first day and puffy the next three. As it was blowing from the shore, it would sometimes be blowing twenty and other times six knots, catching a lot of competitors off guard. Doyle Sailmakers’ Brad Boston on team Jackpot came out on top for his fifth North American Championship win.

Doyle Viper Sails

Jackpot Out In Front Downwind

With his longtime crew of Curtis Florence and Luke Lawrence, Brad Boston won four races and placed second twice to accrue 45 points after twelve races. As a recent interview on Scuttlebutt mentioned, Brad’s program is all about Keeping it Affordable and Keeping it Fun, “on and off the water, from the time we wake up until we fall asleep.”  Not only is the class itself designed to be affordable, Doyle Boston makes sure that they offer value in the sails they provide to the class – delivering both performance and durability.NA 2015 Awards

Doyle has been very involved in the class for many years and therefore keep the designs and materials up to date. The consistency of the results that Doyle Sails have achieved are the result of ongoing sail development and incremental improvements as feedback from customers is received. For the North Americans this year, Brad used the latest set of Flex 16 upwind sails and a Dynakote spinnaker (a slippery nylon fabric which is great for coming in and out of the sock quickly).

Doyle Viper Sails

The team at Doyle Boston Sailmakers not only get out there and win competitions, but make sure to share their knowledge with whoever is willing to listen. Brad, Tac Boston, and Chris Jay offered a week long tuning before the event, available to everyone. Their consistant involvement not only benefits other competitors but ensures that the class continues to grow and remains competitive.

More information about Doyle’s Viper sails can be found here.

Final results can be found here here

Doyle Sails Dominate 2015 Marblehead NOOD Regatta

Marblehead Race Week, now sailed as the Marblehead NOOD Regatta, got underway last week for the 126th running of the regatta with 140 boats competing in 9 different One Design Classes.  As is the case in many years, Doyle-powered boats won the majority of the classes at the Marblehead NOOD Regatta, one of the northeast’s premier annual One-Design Regattas.   Among other highlights, Doyle customers swept the podium in the Rhodes 19, Town Class, and IOD classes, as well as winning the J/70, J/105 at Etchells classes.

Holley WinIn the Rhodes 19 class, the fleet saw one of the most competitive finishes in recent history, with 7 lead changes over the 4 day event and a mere 8 points separated first through sixth.  In the end, Jamie Holley, sailing Mankini with his wife Janice for the first three days and then his son Cameron for the final day, took home the win in a tie-breaker.    When asked what his favorite part of race week was, Jamie answered, “My family. My wife crewed the first few days, and then my son did the last.”  Team Mankini was named the overall winner of Race Week for their performance.Race Week-0040

Holley and his crew beat out second place co-skippers Ken Cormier and Steve Dalton in an overall points tie because Holley ended with two race wins compared to Cormier’s one – both of which he scored in the final two races. “It was a very tough week of sailing,” said Holley. “We were only one of two fleets that had to sail all four days. We were 12 points down coming into the last day of sailing, and we pulled through.”  He added, “There was everything from light air and flat water, to heavy air and high seas. I want to say it takes consistency to win, but we weren’t very consistent. There were at times five boats wide round the mark, and sometimes other factors made it a very complicated regatta.” Interestingly, in the 33-boat fleet, Holley was the only one to win more than one race, with 10 others each winning one race.  Holley was using Doyle’s well proven race sails that have been extensively developed in recent years.

J/70 Africa 2015 NOOD Regatta

Africa Comes into the Windward Mark in the Lead

In the 23-boat J/70 fleet, Jud Smith and AFRICA put on a dominating performance, much of which Smith attributes to just plain better boat speed, coupled with some strong tactical calls from his wife Cindy.  The regatta also doubled as the J/70 New England Championship, and featured some strong competition from as far away as Texas.  Winning 5 of the 10 races, Smith felt good in the range of conditions he saw through the three days of racing.  “We felt like our upwind boat speed and pointing ability was phenomenal.  We’ve fine tuned the jib design a bit in the last few months to allow us to inhaul better which helps with out height off the line.  We were sailing a bit heavy this regatta, so making sure we made our gains upwind was essential to making the whole race work” commented Smith reflecting on the week.  At the end of the regatta, he received the Norman E. Cressy Trophy, which is awarded by the Marblehead Racing Association to the skipper who best displays the outstanding performance at Marblehead Race Week as it relates to fleet competitiveness, sportsmanship and overall smart sailing.  In addition to Smith, three of the top four Corinthian Teams were using Doyle Sails.

Doyle J/105 Sails

allegro semplicita Powers in to the Windward Mark

In the J/105 Class, it was Fred deNapoli on Allegro Semplicita who came away with the win after several lead changes.  Despite his success in other regattas with his boat, deNapoli  had to be pleased with his performance this year, as he previously looked back on his 12 years in the class, remarking “In 2003, I borrowed a J/105 and came in second by a point or two. Last year I again came in second by a point or so. We’ve always been the bridesmaid, and never the bride.”  deNapoli was using Doyle’s latest Stratis jib design, along with a AP Crosscut Main and Airx 700 Class Spinnaker.

Doyle Town Class Sails

Berit Solstad on Lille Venn

In the Town Class, sailing with one of the largest fleets in recent memory. Berit Solstad came away with a commanding victory over local rival Kelley Braun.  After years of dominance in the Town Class, Doyle successful introduced a new mainsail design, which was utilized by Solstad in the victory.

The Etchells fleet, a longtime favorite in Marblehead, was also successful for Doyle One Design’s own Tomas Hornos, who came away with the win after winning half of the 8 races.  Hornos is a relative newcomer in the Etchells fleet, but has put together a string of impressive performances in the last year.

Race Week-0045-1The Marblehead IOD fleet has always been one of the most photogenic fleets around, with classic boats and matching fleet sails, which make for close racing.  This year it was Charlie Richter racing Javelin who came out on top.  Doyle has been proud to supply sails to the IOD fleet in Marblehead, among other venues, and has consistently produced top level sails that perform well over the many years that the sails rotate through.

To learn more about Doyle’s One Design Sails, please visit here.

For Full Regatta Results, please visit here.

Pictures courtesy Bruce Durkee

Mahalo Wins Swan 42 Nationals

Mahalo At Windward MarkSince its debut in 2007, the Swan 42 National Championship has provided close racing in hotly competitive One-Design fleet, with a class that provides a good mix of high-performance boats with strict professional limitations.  As a result, the National Championship has become a highlight of the summer calendar in Newport, and this year featured a mix of teams that were trying to qualify to represent the New York Yacht Club at this fall’s Invitational Cup, as well as international teams that were using the event to prepare for the Invitational Cup – making for a very competitive field.  This year, it was Charles Kenahan’s Mahalo that walked away with the championship, finishing first or second in six of nine races.  In 2014, Doyle Sailmakers began working with Mahalo to develop a new Stratis ICE upwind inventory for the Swan 42 Class.  Third place went to John Greenland of the Royal Thames Yacht Club sailing Better Than, who were also using Doyle Sails with Doyle’s own Alan McGlashan aboard trimming headsails.

Kenahan Win 2015Because of the desire to keep the class Corinthian in many regards, the class has strict sail limitations that put an emphasis on sails that not only perform well initially but hold their shape overtime.  The Stratis ICE sails have proved their worth at this point, having helped Mahalo to impressive performances on both sides of the Atlantic over the last year,  including a 5th place at the  Rolex Swan Cup last fall.

Mahalo Nationals 2015 Diana McConnellKenehan is a relative newcomer to the class, having bought Mahalo in 2012. And he’s had to fight his way up the ladder in a class full of some of the country’s best sailors.  “We had not had our core crew together since the Rolex Swan Cup last September in the Med,” said Kenahan. “We were all very excited to be back together. I spent plenty of time in the back end of the fleet and you look forward and see these boats that are just set up so well, just ‘locked in’, and they tend to carry it for most, if not all, of a regatta. We were just lucky enough that this was our first time ‘locked in’. We’re very pleased about that and we hope we can do it again. It’s camaraderie, pursuit of excellent and it’s a lot of hard work.”

Doyle began the development process last spring  utilizing the same sail design process that has proven successful for some of the most competitive Mini-Maxis and One Design classes, while also looking to utilize materials that would ensure the longevity needed to keep the boats up to speed for years to come.  Combining cutting edge CFD and FEA modeling with extensive on the water validation, Doyle has successfully made in impact an a short amount of time.  “We’re ecstatic with the results we’ve had so quickly and appreciate all that Charles and his team on Mahalo have done to help with that.  Watching Mahalo improve over the last year is a testament to how hard the team has worked.  Results like this are also always a good validation of our sail design and manufacturing technology” commented Robbie Doyle, who has been on the forefront of Doyle’s recent efforts.  “It’s not easy to get into an established class like the Swan 42, but with the resources Doyle has at its disposal we can quickly develop a winning sail program.”

CFD Analysis

 

Shaun Frohlich wins British Etchells Nationals

Shuan Frolich of team Exabyte win the 2015 British Nationals and Open Championship in the Etchells at the Royal London Yacht Club. Exabyte just purchased Doyle’s AP Main and DCM jib.

Shuan Frohlich wins British Etchells Nationals and Open Championship

Shuan Frohlich of team Exabyte wins British Etchells Nationals and Open Championship. Photo by Rob Goddard

“Going into the last race, race six, only Willy McNeil’s Hancock could threaten Frohlich’s regatta. Exabyte needed a sixth or better to take the championship if McNeil won the race, but with the wind that had built to 20kts, Frohlich after a clean start, sailed fast for the port lay line and the stronger westbound tide on the first beat putting him up with the front of the pack, and while Jeremy Thorp won the race, second place was enough to give Shaun Frohlich sailing with Duncan Truswell and David Bedford a very deserved overall victory of the event.” -Rob Goddard, Sail World