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Archive for the ‘Superyacht’ Category

Strong Performance from Doyle Sails at 2016 St Barths Bucket Regatta

St_Barths_Bucket_v2016_logo_128In the increasingly performance-focused superyacht racing scene, Doyle Sails helped propel many yachts to the front of the fleet at this years St Barths Bucket, held off St Barthelemy from March 17-20.  In the end, Doyle powered yachts won three of the five pursuit classes that saw nearly 40 yachts competing.  The regatta saw the fleet sail three races around the archipelago, which challenges the yachts with close roundings around islands and rocks, making the imagery even more stunning.  This year saw moderate breezes for the first two days of racing, and then high winds and big seas in the final day to push all the crews hard to keep these massive yachts moving well.

Sailing Yacht P2

38m Perini Navi P2

38m Perini Navi sloop P2 continued her string of impressive performances with a win in Class B: Les Elegantes des Mers.  P2 has long been a superyacht regatta favorite, and just the previous week P2 won Class B at the Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta in Virgin Gorda.  Under new ownership this year, the boat has continued her impressive ways, and after P2‘s win on Saturday’s “Not So Wiggley Course”, which sees the yachts weave through a number of turns which requires multiple spinnaker sets and douses, tactician Tony Rey commented “The owner and his guests were so engaged and so into the race; everyone was excited.  Honestly, it’s what we came here for; these last two races have been some of the best superyacht racing I’ve ever done. We can’t wait until tomorrow.”  P2 has been carrying the same Doyle Stratis Carbon/Technora racing sails since 2013, and her consistent performance is a testament to the incredibly fast shapes and durability of the Stratis sails.

S&S 125 Axia beating upwind with her new Double Headrig Configuration

In Class C: Les Femmes des Mers 37.6m Axia won with an impressively consistent performance, winning all three races.  Doyle’s own CEO Robbie Doyle was serving as tactician for the regatta, and worked well in advance to help prepare the yacht for the regatta.  In order to keep Axia at the front of the fleet (they also won their class at last years St Barths Bucket) and optimize their rating under the ORCsy Rule, under which the boats are rated for this regatta, Axia went through an headsail development program to improve their tacking time and pointing ability.  The result was a larger staysail and enlarged Jib Top, in place of the original racing Genoa, which kept the yacht fast and nimble as they sailed around the island.  What might be most impressive  about this win is that the same Stratis Main on Axia has now powered the boat through six Buckets – helping the yacht win three of those – in addition to all her other sailing and charters.

56m Perini Navi Rosehearty

56m Perini Navi Rosehearty

In Class E: Les Grandes Dames des Meres 56m Rosehearty and 50m Ohana finished tied at the end of the final day, with Rosehearty’s wins in Races 1 and 2 breaking the tie in her favor.  After winning last year’s Perini Navi Cup, Rosehearty was fitted with a new A3 spinnaker and Mizzen Staysail to ensure that the boat could keep moving at full speed during the Bucket’s many challenging courses.  On the final day of racing, the big breeze helped push the massive yacht at 13.5 knots downwind, but upwind proved a challenge.  A fitting on the genoa furler snapped off in a puff, forcing the yacht to sail a good portion of the long upwind beat with just a staysail. Ultimately the genoa was partially unfurled to keep the boat moving steadily upwind to the turning mark.  Paul Cayard, serving as tactician on Rosehearty, commended the crew of Rosehearty all week, but was especially impressed on the final day “The crew did an outstanding job of dealing with today’s adversity and kept the maneuvers tight so we could preserve the fourth place we needed to win overall. A very happy owner and all concerned.”

The overall results of Doyle Sails this year are a testament to the continuing focus on performance and service from the team at Doyle. The regatta brings a strong team of sailmakers from Doyle’s lofts around the world to ensure that the yachts receive the full benefit of their sails. “I’m incredibly proud of our customers for the results in this year’s event, and it’s truly a testament to the team at Doyle we have assembled in order to help these yachts perform to their best” commented CEO Robbie Doyle.  “Our technology in recent years has continually kept our sails at the front of the fleet, but this year’s team onsite was the best we’ve ever had and helped get everyone across the line safely and quickly.  The results this year show both the grand-prix performance that our sails can achieve, but also the durability and shape holding of these sails over time.”
P3

60m Perini Navi Sloop Perseus^3

This year saw Robbie Doyle and Glenn Cook from Doyle Salem on Axia, Andrew Schneider of Doyle Salem on Rosehearty, Peter Grimm of Doyle Florida East on Perseus^3, Quinten Houry of Doyle Palma on Clan VIII, John Baxter from Doyle Midwest on Blue Too, Nick Bonner of Doyle England on Surama, Simon Lacey of Doyle New Zealand on Emmaline, Matt Bridge of Doyle New Zealand on Seahawk, Alan McGlashan of Doyle Salem on Bella Regazza, and Mario Giattino and Salvo D’amico of Doyle Italy and Justin Ferris of Doyle New Zealand on Ohana.

Doyle Sailmakers is proud to have a long history as a sponsor of the Bucket regattas, and has established lofts in all of the superyacht hubs around the world to ensure excellent service for the world’s largest yachts.  Recently Doyle has delivered sails to many of the world’s largest yachts, including the 60m Perini Navi Perseus^3, which made her debut at St Barths this year, the 46m Royal Huisman Elfje,and the 89m Perini Navi Maltese Falcon.  In the coming months Doyle Sailmakers will deliver sails to the two largest sailing yachts in the world, both measuring over 100m in length.

Full results can be found here.

New sails give iconic Mari Cha III a burst of speed

Custom carbon Doyle Stratis ICE sails have been fitted to iconic yacht, Mari Cha III, delivering performance and speed.

Mari Cha III has completed 5000 miles in just over a month of cruising with her new Doyle Stratis ICE sails, and her Captain Christian Lay has given us his take on how the new additions are performing under pressure.

The yacht was fitted with a full wardrobe of high performance ICE sails, created at Doyle Sails New Zealand’s Auckland loft, and the 44-metre yacht has been putting her new sail inventory through its paces. With the light, durable sails, Mari Cha III has found no loss of stability in arduous elements, delivering better performance and longevity.

“One of the big things we have noticed is how much easier the sails are to use than our previous ones. They set really easily and hold their shape so well,” says Lay.

“All the little details that we customised for this boat have made sail handling and manoeuvres, such as reefing, so much easier. The boat is very clearly faster. The service leading up to, getting hold of and then commissioning the sails cannot be faulted.”

MariChaIII

Doyle Sails New Zealand’s Matt Bridge says the company enjoyed the process of producing the high-performance sails for the yacht.

“This was the first set of Doyle sails for Mari Cha III and working on such a well-known yacht was a really satisfying experience for us,” says Bridge, superyacht sails coordinator, Doyle Sails New Zealand.

“There was also a nice synergy for us, given that Doyle Sails New Zealand’s own Mike ‘Moose’ Sanderson, sailed onboard Mari Cha III during her record-breaking TransAtlantic crossing in 1998,” says Bridge.

ICE is a new generation UHMWP sail fibre first applied to the marine industry by the Doyle Stratis team, and tests have shown an exceptionally high resistance to flex fatigue, with ICE retaining its initial shape longer than other sail membranes.

“Dealing with the mizzen staysails and big code sails is now really easy and we can get rid of the 900 square meter Code 0, in about 10 seconds, which allows us to sail the boat harder and more aggressively with a smaller crew,” says Lay.

“We have already done 5000 miles with them in a little over a month and had every configuration possible in winds up to 40 knots. There have been no issues with stretch, chafe or wear. We have pushed them downhill with boat speeds into the mid 20 knot region and then done big round ups in big breeze to get them down. The new batten system hasn’t broken one yet which is a big improvement for us.”

“In short I think it’s fair to say that we are pretty bloody happy with them and I am now thinking about which other sails we need to buy for the upcoming adventures. Oh – and for the first time – we have some decent sail bags that are strong enough, big enough, which have enough hand holds and look cool with the names on,” ends Lay.

To learn more about the unique Stratis ICE fiber, please visit here.

Stratis Sail Art – Photo Quality Printing on Sails

Doyle Sails offers Stratis Sail Art, which allows photo quality printing on sails for the first time ever.

SailArt2

Doyle Stratis Sail Art on Comer 100 Shadow

Doyle Stratis Sails, already offering a high degree of customization between fiber combinations and surface types, offers an entirely new customization in printing of any graphics on the sail surface before the sails are laminated, resulting in the most-detailed sail art to date.

Having long realized the need to offer special images for customers and commercial sponsorship, Doyle has created a number of stunning sail graphics over the years, but has taken it to the next level with Comar Yachts’ Shadow – the first yacht to have been fitted with Stratis Sail Art sails. The 100’ yacht, launched in 2011, was fitted with Doyle Stratis Membranes complete with a photo-quality octopus finished by the team at Doyle Sails Palma.

SailArtMoving away from the traditional technique of painting directly onto sail, the new procedure allows the the image to be printed directly onto the sails surface with incredible accuracy before the membranes are laminated in New Zealand. The printing process means that detail, form and subtle nuances are transferred to the sail with unerring accuracy, making for the most detailed sail art to date. In the case of the Shadow this meant an octopus stretching down the sail on each side – carefully aligned to stretch across the Main and Jib.

The mosaic-like print has layers of colour, shapes and overlaid details which bring the two octopi to life as the sail fills. Despite the layers of detail, the end result is noticeably lighter than the sail would be if the image was created using the traditional approach of layering paint by hand – something which at this size would normally add 10-15kgs to a sail.

Lightness is a known characteristic of Stratis. Forming the base for Stratis Sail Art, the underlaying Stratis membranes have a formidable reputation for high performance and resistance to flex fatigue.

SailArt5The unique Stratis Sail Art process doesn’t compromise the sails’ integrity, compared with the traditional paint process which can result in brittle sail membranes. Full photo images can be translated onto the sails – drastically increasing the appeal of sails as a billboard to sponsors – with a high definition finish that’s as effective close up as it is from a distance.
‘Stratis Sail Art is the next generation in sail art,” says Doyle Sails New Zealand managing director, Chris McMaster.

“It adds negligible weight to the end product, while maintaining the integrity of the sail and performance Stratis is known for.”

SailArt4Doyle Sails New Zealand’s Auckland loft is the biggest in the southern hemisphere and is well-known for its innovation; creating Stratis, Stratis ICE and a range of other products. Now, adding Stratis Sail Art to its stable of products, the Doyle Sails New Zealand team is proud to not only be able to offer sails which perform unlike anything else on the water, but look unlike anything else on the water.

Learn more about Doyle Sail Graphics.

 

Doyle Sailmakers Delivers Sails to 60m Perini Navi Sloop Perseus^3

Perseus^3

After over two years of design, engineering and construction, Doyle Sailmakers has fit sails on the impressive new Perini Navi Sloop, Perseus^3 in La Spezia, Italy this past week.  The sail inventory, produced in Salem, Massachusetts, is one of the largest and most complex ever assembled, and will provide a breathtaking and unprecedented racing and sailing experience for the owners and crew. Perseus^3 stands apart from her peers with both her carbon clearcoat mast – one of the world’s tallest – and for her A2 Spinnaker – the world’s largest sail – measuring in at 28,010 square feet (2,602 square meters).

Two years’ worth of work came together in two days in Italy, as the Mainsail, Reacher and Blade Jib were fitted for the first time.  The yacht will now begin her series of sea trials and sail system trials, gradually adding in the remainder of this spectacular racing inventory.

From the onset, performance was the clear goal of this project. Doyle Sailmakers was involved with the process from the beginning, working with Ron Holland Design, Perini Navi and Future Fibres to optimize every aspect of the sailing experience.   The mast was carefully engineered to assist with the massive sail area of the yacht.  From Doyle Sailmaker’s end, the size of the sails entailed a novel approach to both engineering the materials and sail handling.  Taking it one step further, Doyle CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) addressed the challenges of properly balancing the load on the three headstays, with the additional Code 0 Torque Rope, while still maintaining an acceptable headstay sag for the racing requirements of the yacht.  Working with the engineers at Perini Navi, Future Fibers and Germanisher-Lloyd, Doyle CFD helped establish the proper balance and stability of loads on the stays and the sails.

Doyle CFD Analysis

Doyle Sailmakers has long been known for its innovation and this project is no exception.  With prior experience coming from M5, Athos and Kokomo III, Doyle Sailmakers constantly adds new innovations and continues to enhance the overall sailing experience.  New developments for this project include  an inboard end fitting for the battens that isolates both the forward compression of the battens as well as eliminating vertical shifting.  This new design ensures that the custom Perini Navi slides will enter the track without compromising the luff tape – essential to reliable sailing with rollboom mainsails.  Additionally, the working jib, hoisted on a removable inner forestay, necessitates innovative soft hanks that automatically change in diameter as the sail is lowered to allow the sail flake over the larger diameter torque tube at the base of the torque rope.

Perseus^3 is the first vessel from Perini Navi to include a bow sprit – enabling the yacht to carry a number of massive downwind racing sails.  The two spinnakers are among the largest sails ever made. The A2 measures in at 28,010 square feet (2602 square meters) and utilizes over 3,200 yards of cloth.  Initially, there was no existing fabric capable of delivering high performance, light weight and a ‘soft hand’ for handling.  The solution was an extensively tested fabric that blends Polyester with Dyneema – giving the cloth high strength as well as tear resistance.

The Code 0 will also fly off the sprit, and is being furled on the largest Top Down Furling Cable ever created by Future Fibres.  After previous success with Top Down Furling for Code 0’s – with the cable in a contained luff sleeve – this was selected for Perseus^3 to enable the crew to quickly furl the sail and stow it easily.  The Code 0 has been constructed  using Doyle Sailmaker’s proprietary Stratis process, with curved radial seams to follow the path of the loads and enable precise shaping, high strength and minimal weight.

Perini LogoPerini Navi Group, a leader in the design and construction of many of the world’s largest sailing and motor yachts, has long been one of Doyle Sailmaker’s most important partners in the superyacht market.

“We first worked with Perini Navi on Andromeda le Dea in 1990, which at the time was one of the most technologically sophisticated yachts afloat.  We have been pleased to work with them since on some of their highest performing and noticeable projects – from the majestic 88m Maltese Falcon, the racing oriented 38m Sloop P2, or the signature purple sails of the 50m Ketch Baracuda,”  said Robbie Doyle, CEO of Doyle Sailmakers. “We always enjoy working with Perini Navi as they share our passion for sailing and innovation, and are always working to deliver the very finest product to their customers.”  In just this last year, Doyle Sailmakers has been fortunate enough to deliver sails to the 56m Ketch Audace, 52m Ketch Tamsen, 50m Ketch …Is A Rose, 50m Ketch Silencio, 45m Sloop Clan VIII, 40m Sloop State of Grace and currently has sails underway for the 56m Ketch Asahi and 45m Sloop Helios.

Main and BoomThe mast and boom for Perseus^3 were produced by Future Fibers, and at  75.8m the mast stands among the three tallest rigs ever built in the world.  “We have managed to produce a tube with a perfect exterior surface and a flawless Clearcote gloss Carbon finish with zero filler – which can add up to 3 per cent to the weight of a mast,” according to Future Fibres.   The mast weight is optimized at 16.4 tonnes.  Similarly, the 23.4m carbon fiber furling boom has been manufactured using pre-preg carbon improving structural performance and weight, compared with standard wet–laminate construction. The boom features a new mandrel furling and locking system, as a result of extensive testing and prototyping.

In order to ensure safe sailing, Perseus^3 will feature an exclusive Rig Load Monitoring System that monitors the loads acting on the sails and rig components through a series of strain gauges.

For the handling and control of the impressive sailing system, Perseus^3 features the new generation of Perini Navi captive winches and furlers. The jib winches pull a maximum load of 30 tonnes and have a maximum line speed of 40 meters per minute. Electric variable speed motors and furlers, duly synchronized and monitored by the Perini Navi Automated Sail Handling System, dramatically improve furling and deploy times while speeding the tacking and jibing time by over 75% compared to vessels of the previous generation.

Gallery: Perseus^3 Mast and Sail Installation

Sail Inventory:
Main Sail: 808 m2 The mast features 4 main sail locks: 1 full hoist + 3 reefs Batten car system Cunningham ram
Reacher: 1,160 m2
Blade Jib: 706 m2 with carbon vertical battens
Working Jib: 370 m2 On soft hanks and removable torque cable
Code 0: 1,804 m2 On the biggest torque cable TDF ever built by Future Fibres
A2: 2,602 m2
A3: 2,173 m2
Spinnaker Staysail: 721 m2

Technical Features:Future Fibres
Mast: 75.8m Carbon Fibre by Future Fibres
Boom: 23.4m Carbon Fibre by Future Fibres
Standing rigging: Lateral Rigging in Carbon Fibre Aft and Fore Stays in Carbon+PBO+Kevlar

 

 

2014 St. Barths Bucket Recap

Dubois 122' Moonbird

Dubois 122 Moonbird

S&S 125 Axia

Superyachts from around the world were on hand for what turned out to be perfect conditions at the 2014 St. Barths Bucket Regatta, spanning three days from March 28-30. Doyle Sailmakers’ staff were sailing on many of the boats at the event. Doyle Sailmakers’ founder and president Robbie Doyle was on-board the 125’ S&S designed Axia, Chris McMaster and Justin Ferris from Doyle New Zealand were onboard the new 164’ Dubois Ohana, Quinny Houry from Doyle Palma was on the 148’ Perini Clan VIII, John Baxter from Doyle Chicago was on-board the Holland 112’ Blue Too and Matt Bridge from Doyle New Zealand was on the 122’ Dubois Moonbird.

Holland 112' Blue Too
Holland 112 Blue Too

 

The conditions for the week were near perfect with 15-22 kts. Fresh off her win in the BVI’s, Moonbird placed second in the Mademoiselles Class, sporting a full set of new performance focused Doyle Stratis ICE sails. She was followed in third by Blue Too, who in addition to her third place finish, also took home the Alloy Trophy for the best performance by an Alloy yacht. The 31m Dubois Sarafin finished in fourth place flying a new Doyle Stratis jib.

50m Perini Silencio
50m Perini Navi Silencio

In the Grand Dames Class, the 50m Perini Navi ketch Silencio won the last race in her class to put her into third in her division. Silencio was using a brand new Doyle A2 spinnaker for the regatta, measuring in at nearly 13,000 square feet and featuring a massive Lion inlay. She finished 1 point clear of the new 40m Perini Navi Performance sloop State of Grace who was powered by a full inventory of Doyle sails.

Congratulations to all of the winners and looking forward to the 2015 St Barths Bucket.

To view the final results, click here.

40m Perini State of Grace

40m Perini  Navi State of Grace

Moonbird Wins Loro Piana Caribbean Superyacht Regatta & Rendezvous 2014

The 2014 superyacht racing season started on a strong note, with Moonbird winning Class C at the 2014 Loro Piana Caribbean Superyacht Regatta & Rendezvous.  Moonbird, built by Fitzroy Yachts and designed by Ed Dubois, is a 123′ sloop that was recently fitted with a new mast and Stratis ICE sails.  Matt Bridge from Doyle Sails New Zealand was sailing with the team on Moonbird.  Second place was the Oyster 100 Sarafin, and third was Tempus Fugit, a new 90′ sloop from Arkin Pruva Yachts – both of which carry Doyle sails.

Moonbird

Moonbird. Photo by Superyacht Media.

In class A, the 164′ sloop Ohana placed third and Leopard by Robertissima was fifth with full Doyle inventories.  Chris McMaster and Justin Ferris from Doyle Sails New Zealand were sailing onboard Ohana.

The next event will be the St. Barths Bucket, with racing starting on Friday the 28th.  Moonbird, Sarafin and Ohana will be joined by other Doyle powered boats, including Axia, Blue Too, State of Grace and Zenji.

For complete regatta results, please visit here.  All photos courtesy Boat International Media.

Shockwave Wins Caribbean 600

Shockwave at Redonda.  Credit Tim Wright/photoaction.comGeorge Sakellaris’ R/P 72 Shockwave took the overall IRC win in this year’s Caribbean 600, correcting out to finish roughly 1 hour ahead of rival Bella Mente.  After 600 miles of racing, Bella Mente, Rambler 90 and Shockwave crossed the line within 15 minutes of each other, after close racing all along that saw numerous lead changes.  The win adds to Shockwave’s growing list of recent victories, highlighted by her Gibbs Hill Lighthouse Division win in the 2012 Newport-Bermuda Race and first in the 2013 Montego Bay Race.  The overall IRC win was the highlight of a number of impressive finishes for Doyle-powered boats, with Line Honors for Bella Mente – carrying some specialty reaching sails from Doyle and featuring Doyle’s own Mike Sanderson as a helmsman, Botin 65 Caro, with a full Doyle Stratis inventory taking 5th overall in IRC, First 40 Lancelot II winning IRC Two with a new Doyle Stratis Mainsail, and the 62m Hoek Schooner Athos greatly improving on last years performance and battling it out with longtime superyacht rival Adela.

A grueling 600 mile race circling around many islands, with stiff breeze the whole time, the race places a premium on having a well prepared boat and crew.  In anticipation of this year’s race, Doyle refined the sail inventory to make sure that the team would have the right sails, without carrying too many.  Robbie Doyle, who in addition to managing the sail inventory served as Shockwave’s tactician for this race, explains the thought process, “We looked at the conditions that we were likely to see, and then when designing and building the sails worked to make sure that their ranges were as large as possible.  Thankfully our Stratis process allows us to make some of the lightest sails available, so we increased the DPI’s a bit to ensure we could carry the same sails longer.”

RORC Caribbean 600, 2014“With the amount that conditions change in this race, sail changes can just be too costly.  In the end, we used the J2 (Medium Jib) 95% of the time, and just twisted it off a bit in the bigger squalls.  We only carried 3 jibs, which helped save weight.”  Flying the same jib up the majority of the race allows the crew to stay aft and on the rail, keeping the boat moving.  The other big change was adding a new Fractional Code 0.  “After last year’s Montego Bay Race, we looked at our sail inventory and felt that the jump from the Jib Top to the Code 0 was too big.  We built a new FRO to fill that gap.  It was the workhorse of the race, as coupled with the Top Down Furler, we could leave it up, and just furl or unfurl as the conditions changed without any drama on the foredeck.”

Owner George Sakellaris was pleased with the results.  “I have a great crew and it was an excellent race, lots of wind and the racing was very close.  I have done many offshore races but this is the first time I have raced this one and it was against tough opposition. I think the winds were favorable to us and the Shockwave team used that to our advantage. At the end of the day, winning yacht races is all about the team performance more than anything else.

Robbie Doyle was similarly enthusiastic after the race. “That is what ocean racing should be all about.  Beautiful racing between three very tough competitors, all fighting it out the whole way.  A heavy-weight battle without a doubt – no question. I have had great moments in sail boats, but that was as much fun as I can remember. For 600 miles we were always in touch with each other, either up a few minutes or down a few minutes, and it all came down to the last beat to finish. It was like an epic tennis match.”

Next up for Team Shockwave will be defending her Newport-Bermuda Race victory in June.

Team Shockwave After Finishing

Team Shockwave After Finishing

Gallery: Doyle Sails in the 2014 Caribbean 600