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Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

Doyle-powered Yachts Dominate at the Coastal Classic 2013

The 2013 edition of the Coastal Classic saw more than 160 yachts of all shapes and sizes line up for the 119nm race from Auckland to Russell. The race was hotly contested, particularly in Division 6 where visitors Team Australia were aiming to claim victory over title-holders Team Vodafone, who had taken line honors for three years previously. With the pair considered to be the fastest yachts in Australasia, it was all to play for.

It was a strong race for the Doyle powered boats with good performances in all divisions, including podium positions by handicap in six of the divisions. Team Australia took line honours with a time of eight hours and 15 minutes, nearly 40 minutes ahead of Team Vodafone, winning the Duke of Marlbourough Cup for the first boat to finish, and the Alexander Flynn Trophy for first multihull to finish. Omega 8, which features a full Doyle inventory, came first in Division 1 and was also the overall winner of the race. Both yachts were carrying Doyle’s innovative new Stratis carbon ICE sails, as well as Stratis carbon technora mains, and the results speak for themselves.

As well as the overall successes, there were excellent divisional results. Division 2 saw third on the line and second place by handicap for Outrageous Fortune, which carries a partial Doyle inventory. In Division 3 R N B, with a full Doyle inventory, took first place (line and handicap), Division 4 saw first place (line and handicap) for No Worries, which has a partial Doyle inventory, and Division 7 first place on the line forCharleston, which also has a partial Doyle inventory.

Below we have race reports from Simon Kidd, of Doyle Sails, who was racing on overall winner Omega 8, and from Mike Sanderson, Head of Sales at Doyle Sails, who was racing with line winners Team Australia.

Omega 8 – overall winner and 1st place in Division 1

Race report by Simon Kidd

Omega 8 Coastal Race

It was always going to be a great race for Omega upwind, with pressure and the breeze backing later in the day. We started well ahead of the starting gun with preparation on the boat, which is half the battle, dropping the rudder to service the bearing and undertaking several other small maintenance jobs. For the sail inventory we added a new Stratis ICE Code 2 headsail, which we carried from North Head up the coast, and also a new Stratis carbon technora mainsail.

Omega 8 2

With a large fleet off the line there was some urgency to set the Doyle A3 laminated gennaker and we made a nice jump on the other 40′s down to North Head. We had a good run up to Sail Rock with a long port tack and couple of short starboard tacks. Just after Sail Rock a squall came through and we ended up bareheaded for a couple of minutes before settling back into a slightly cracked jib top and then into the Code 0 which carried us through to the Cape Brett. The 40 fleet was locked together with MojoPower PlayPretty Boy Floyd and Lawless all metres apart as we cleared the Brett.

Omega was in her element with an 150% overlapping headsail we laid pretty much through to the Black Rocks, having taken advantage of the incoming tide and then a long starboard tack through to Tapeka Point. A short tack and we laid up to the finish just as the breeze started to die, with the tide changing as we finished. Skipper and owner Scott McLaren was delighted with the result and very complementary of both the crew and also the Doyle sails that powered Omega to her win.

Team Australia – First place on the line, and third place by handicap in Division 6

Race report by Mike Sanderson

Sanderson Team Australia

Mike Sanderson racing on board Team Australia – photo by LiveSailDie

It’s a long time since someone brought a boat all the way from Australia for the Coastal Classic and so when owner Sean Langman and his team made noises about bringing their very cool ORMA TrimaranTeam Australia over for the 2013 event it was pretty exciting news. Team Australia is, like local boat Team Vodafone, an ex French ORMA Class box rule boat, maximum length, maximum beam, maximum mast length and that’s about it… they were developed for a combination of round the buoy Grand Prix events and single and double handed Trans-Atlantic racing. Until the creation of the AC 72 they were the most developed large multihull in the world.

Team Australia started their campaign by setting a new bench mark for the Trans-Tasman sailing record, crossing from Sydney to Auckland in 2 days 19 hours 2 mins 45 seconds. Their new record, now ratified by the World Speed Sailing Association, has set the bar very high for others to try and have a crack at. Once in Auckland, with the crew recovered from their Tasman ordeal, we set about getting her ready for the Coastal Classic. This entailed the guys removing all the offshore equipment and most excitingly the fitting of three new Doyle sails to compliment the new Mainsail we fitted late last year prior to their successful Sydney-Hobart record run. Ahead of the Coastal Classic Team Australia got a new Radial Stratis gennaker, and replaced both the primary headsails, the “Solent” and “Trinquette.” These new sails were utilizing our very latest technology with both the Jibs being Stratis carbon ICE. All the sails went straight on and fitted like gloves and were “sweet as,” to use the words of one of the crew.

Team Australia 2

Team Australia – Richard Gladwell

Race day came around and I think I was the most excited person in Auckland, with the prospect of an upwind beat to Russell, knowing we had two brand new jibs in our arsenal.

The start went well, with Sean’s years of skiff sailing paying good dividends. We won the race to North Head but soon after Team Vodafone got through us by just carrying bigger sails. Team Australia is less powerful then Vodafone and so we decided to go with the smaller Trinquette jib. During the reach to Kawau Island we struggled to hang on to them as their added power let them slip away. Around Kawau we cut the corner on them and were right back into it… we then exchanged a couple of tacks and with the wind forecast to go left, we protected that side and were starting to pay good dividends. Just as we were about to tack and clear ahead the $10 lashing that held the Solent Jib up snapped and we had the jib fall on the deck. There is no halyard for this sail, it gets hoisted on a Gennaker halyard and then lashed, so we had to change down to the Trinquette and set about to catch them up.

Whangarei Heads was always going to be an interesting landmark to get past in a Westerly breeze. We saw Vodafone go wide and so hit the beach. This paid off big time and while they were struggling offshore in light winds and headed breeze, we were smoking down the beach. From the time we got past them through to when we finally rounded Cape Brett I believe we were just quicker, as we reasonably quickly extended our lead out to nearly 40 minutes from there it was a blasting reach into the finish..

All in all it was a very satisfying win for Team Australia, we certainly had had our share of obstacles along the way! A big thanks to Sean and the Team Australia team for putting their faith in Doyle Stratis sails to power their amazing boat, and thanks also to our team for delivering. Let’s hope Sean can bring the boat back next year to have a crack at defending our title!

Breakdown of leading results from Doyle-powered yachts

Division 1
Line Honours

V5 – third
Wired – fourth

Handicap

Omega 8 – first, and first overall for the Coastal Classic
O’Sinnerman* – third

Division 2
Line Honours

Outrageous Fortune* – third
Frenzy – fourth

Handicap

Outrageous Fortune* – second

Division 3
Line Honours

R N B – first

Handicap

R N B – first

Division 4
Line Honours

No Worries* – first
Wild Oats* – third

Handicap

No Worries* – first
Wild Oats* – second
Heaven N Hell* – third

Division 6
Line Honours

Team Australia – first

Handicap

Team Australia – third

Division 7
Line Honours

Charleston* – first

*Partial Doyle Inventory

In Depth “Innerview” with Richard Bouzaid and Mike Sanderson of Doyle NZ

Sailing Anarchy recently sat down with Doyle’s Head Designer Richard Bouzaid and Mike Sanderson to talk about everything from the latest Stratis development, to design to Grand Prix programs to Superyachts.  Well worth viewing for some insight from two of the top guys in the industry.

Sails Conference: Moose and the Buzzard from Doyle NZ with Sailing Anarchy’s “Innerview” from On The Water Anarchy on Vimeo.

Shockwave Wins Key West Race Week

After winning IRC 1 of both the 2012 Charleston Race Week and NYYC Annual Regatta, and then overall in the 2012 Bermuda Race professional division under both IRC and ORR Shockwave ended her 2012 racing season with an unfortunate  “bang” – hitting an unmarked rock in Sardinia. She has opened her 2013 racing with a different impact – by defeating one of the latest designs, and current mini-maxi World Champion, Bella Mente, in a head to head battle in the 2013 Key West Race Week.

SW Crossing Bella Mente

Photo Credit: Chris Odom/ChrisOdomPhoto.com (www.chrisodomphoto.com)

Turning the 5 year old 72’ Shockwave into one of the winningest programs in the world has been an ongoing process that has challenged all aspects of Doyle Sailmakers and its sister engineering company, Doyle CFD, as well as the entire Shockwave Racing Team.  Doyle Sailmakers combined data and feedback from sailing the boat  with an advanced scientific approach – utilizing the latest CFD and FEA to analyze highly defined driving and heeling forces and the resultant loads - to make decisions on not only sails but also integrating mast and bulb shapes.  It has meant working closely with the design team at Reichel-Pugh, as well as the mast designers and other hardware suppliers to ensure that everything worked cohesively.  The confidence of owner-driver George Sakellaris and his captain Reggie Cole has been a major factor as well.

The challenge was not only to catch up to the top boats of the time, but to improve such that Shockwave was competitive with the newest boats coming out of the design offices, as well as to keep up with the top boats that were always being tweaked for just a bit more performance.  Step one was to completely model the boat using CFD to try various sail shapes and sail configurations to see how various options would affect the driving and heeling forces while at the same time keeping an eye on the rating.  Doyle CFD came up with a main design that had a significantly larger square top than conventional IRC wisdom recommended at the time due to the rating “penalty.”  However, the analysis showed that with the optimum section shapes it would increase speed enough to more than offset the rating increase.  It proved effective enough to help the boat to a second place at 2011 Copa del Rey series in Palma, and a 3rd in the 2011 Maxi-Worlds.  Sail by sail, the entire sail inventory was replaced, carefully analyzing new shapes to determine interaction with other sails as well as the hull and rig. The latest FEA analysis allowed Doyle’s design team to optimize string layouts in the sail, resulting in significant weight savings over the previous inventory.  Not only does the weight that is aloft matter, but the overall weight in the boat matters.  In this league everything counts!SW CFD Run

Doyle’s CFD analysis combined with RM analysis confirmed what was known from sailing – Shockwave was a bit challenged in stability to be a truly all-around boat. Additionally, the mast was more limber than was preferred, preventing simply modifying the keel.  Thus, a new mast and keel were ordered.  Many mast sectional options were considered as one had to weigh the increased windage of the larger section versus the increased weight of a smaller, heavier walled section. Shockwave ended up with the best of both as by starting with the large section and using CFD to re-design it to minimize windage for upwind sailing angles she ended up with the lightest mast that matched the low windage of the smallest proposed section.

While stiff enough to be effective up and downwind the boat was still going to be challenged on a reach.  On the water trials confirmed what CFD had indicated: the boat still didn’t have the Righting Moment to effectively carry an A3 Reaching spinnaker in any significant breeze.  The Bermuda Race was one of the top goals for the 2012 season – and typically features plenty of reaching.  Trial CFD runs were performed with smaller A3s as well as large reaching headsails for which a penalty would be paid, as well the “Reaching Code 0.” Because it carried no penalty and could be tailored to match our Righting Moment, the “Reaching Code 0” was decided upon.  It was a good choice.  Shockwave carried the sail  about 65% of the way to Bermuda and led to her victory.  Using the ultra-lightweight Stratis membrane made this sail extremely light weight and yet tough enough to withstand the typical Gulf Stream squalls.

SWwith Spin 4Following the meeting with the rock in Sardinia there was no choice but to get a new keel and bulb.  John Reichel of Reichel-Pugh and Tyler Doyle of Doyle CFD burned the midnight oil trying many iterations of bulbs before deciding on one that not only added significant stability upwind but has clearly improved Shockwave’s off the wind performance.

When interviewed after winning this past Key West Race Week, Robbie Doyle was asked “What has Shockwave done to get her performance to where it is today?” His response pretty much summed up the story: “Nothing really major, but many, many, many little things. The Team has come together in all aspects of execution, and the boat is in a truly sweet spot in terms of balance. We have used a chisel rather than a hammer.”

In advance of Key West, the design team worked on a new concept A1 for VMG course racing in under 7 knots, which proved very successful.  A new A1.5 was made with lighter materials and a slightly larger range to tie in with the new A1, and a new A4 that reflected refinements over the previous sails.  In addition, a new Spinnaker Staysail was made that was substantially lighter than its predecessor and with a smoother furling system for easy sets and douses during inshore buoy racing.  With regards to upwind sails, the boat was sporting a new, larger mainsail and a new J2 that was designed for a balanced entry and twist profile with tighter sheeting angles.

Next up for Shockwave is the Jamaica Race in February.

Shockwave was lucky enough to have Chris Odom onboard Wednesday, who produced this video of the action during the days racing.

Key West 2013 – Wednesday from Chris Odom Photo on Vimeo.

VIDEO: It’s Gotta Be the Sails

From Sailing Anarchy: It’s Gotta Be the Sails

It’s no surprise to us that Alex Thomson is managing to stay on the tail of the leading three boats in the 2012 Vendee Globe despite sailing a boat that’s been around for half a decade; after all, at least one of our prognosticators picked him to win the thing outright. Is he just that fast, or does he have another secret?

We grabbed Doyle Sails New Zealand boss Chris McMaster just before the start of the race to explain why Alex is the only sailor in the fleet not sailing with North or Incidences sails. Chris has plenty to say about their development program, and it’s a good look at one of the one of the most important decisions a round-the-world racer makes.

VIDEO: Vendée Globe Week 7 Highlights from HUGO BOSS

At the end of Week 7 and with Alex midway across the Pacific here is team director, Stewart Hosford’s, weekly update

“Alex crossed the international date line and jumped back in-time in the early morning of Christmas Eve, and well ahead of my predictions, as a consequence he had two Christmas Eve days. His short Christmas day video message is guaranteed to make you want to edge even closer to the fireplace over the holiday break..

“Alex in the last few days has passed another very important milestone that we talked about before this race started and that was to get further in this race than he has previously gone (passed a long time ago in the Indian Ocean) but also to pass the furthest point that the boat had also gone before (in the last Vendee Globe Seb Josse sailed this boat to ~900 miles past New Zealand branded BT). Alex is now well past this point and pointing straight at the final ice gate – Pacific East and onwards to Cape Horn. The routing shows Alex is likely to pass cape Horn sometime around the 3rd or 4th of January. I have to tell you that as a team, getting Alex out of the Southern Ocean and back into the Atlantic, will be a HUGE relief to us all.”

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VIDEO: Vendée Globe Week 6 Highlights from HUGO BOSS

It was another tough week for Alex with his power switched off in some rough southern ocean conditions. With Christmas just days away it is not going to get a lot easier. Stewart Hosford and electronics specialist, Rachel Howe look back on the week…:

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VIDEO: Vendée Globe Week 5 Highlights from HUGO BOSS

As Alex spends the day immersed in continuing repairs to HUGO BOSS here is a look at his week just gone by:

With a few more repairs now behind him, Alex has now met Cyclone Claudia. Here is his update from yesterday morning:

“Very glad to have the wind back and to be going fast agin. Yesterday and this morning was all about getting the composite repairs done to the rudder cassettes. I had hoped for good conditions but did not get them as it has rained continuously for the last 36 hours. This morning was even more difficult trying to get the laminate on while the boat was surfing over 20 knots. Thank god for duck tape otherwise all my dirty work would have been washed away. Again the job is not pretty but i hope it will be functional and I have managed to do it without losing too many miles.

I have hooked up with Claudia nicely but the road ahead is not straight forward. I will have a couple of days negotiating this low and another one which will form to my south west but hopefully whatever happens it is fast sailing and i can find a route back to the south.”

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