Posts Tagged ‘Doyle Sailmakers (Salem MA)’

Half of Star North American’s top ten powered by Doyle

The 2016 edition of the Star Class North American Championship was held at Chicago Yacht Club. Despite an early seasons change occurring this fall, the organizers and volunteers put on a solid event. Although the tune up regatta was light, the primary event was overall a breezy one, with the second race abandoned and the second day called off for the day. Despite beginning the third day with an inability to anchor the RC boat, the organized found a window late in the day to get two races off. Only the final day brought medium breeze in race four and a light air race five ending in drifting conditions.
Chicago Yacht Club Race Committee in tricky conditions
Doyle was excited to have five boats in the top ten. Our sails have consistently had upwind speed in heavy air, which was showcased by early regatta favorite and concluding winner, Melleby/Revkin. Doyle currently offers two varieties of jibs. The J6R, which Melleby was using, is a great uprange jib. Its cloth held up well and the radial panel layout allows for no stretch or extra fullness, reminding us of why the J6R is so successful in medium to heavy air conditions. Anosov/Caesar, third place finishers, used both the J6R and J8C, which gave him good range and power for the extreme wave conditions. Both sails use a Dimension Polyant square weave cloth, which can clearly take a beating, making either jib ideal for long events or use in multiple regattas.
Melleby/Revkin 8177 and Hornos/Baltins 8367
Doyle recently updated the luff curve on our mains (M14+ and M14R), which was noticed by fifth place finisher, Will Swigart. His radial main allowed him and crew, Brian Fatih, to have good beats and perform well. The biggest story of this event, however, was the use of the new Burton mast by both Melleny and Anosov. Anosov had previously won the 2016 District 1 Championship with this stiffer mast. It became clear before that event that mainsail development would be needed to match the increased stiffness of the Burton. Anosov used the M5B design. Since then, he and Doyle’s Jud Smith have been the leaders for main development.
Winners of Star North Americans (Melleby/Revkin)

After sailing with the new mast, using various mains, and analyzing photos, Jud has come up with a suitable main for the Burton mast, versus the standard Emmetti. Melleby used M11B and Anasov used M5B, which can tolerate a firmer leech and a more open top batten compared to M14+ on a stiffer mast. The speed of both Anosov and Melleby at North Americans is a promising first sign of this new mast design and complimenting Doyle main design. Going forward, Doyle Sails will continue to work with Arthur Anosov, Josh Revkin, and Rob Burton to produce quality sails for both Emmetti and Burton spars.

 Contact Doyle One Design’s Tomas Hornos for more information
Loft: 978-740-5950

Doyle Podium Finish at J70 Worlds

Jud Smith brought a new team together for the Rolex Big Boat Series, hosted by Saint Francis Yacht Club, serving as the only opportunity for Africa to get up to speed on bay conditions in San Francisco prior to the Worlds, a far cry from East Coast conditions.  This team consisted of Victor Diaz (tactician), Alec Anderson (trimmer), and Ed Wright (strategist.) Racing at 730 pounds (not particularly heavy relative to other teams), they finished fourth in the big boat series and went on to get a podium finish of third in the Worlds, scoring more first place finishes than any other boat.

For this windy event, Jud used the same jib design, Doyle J6R, which won him the light air San Diego North Americans. This design has always had a much higher clew, which allows for more effective inhauling and a longer foot (since all the girth measurement points move closer to the head.) Inhauling assists with pointing and improves the effective performance range of the one and only jib. We use Dimension ProRadial HTP, as it has the lowest stretch and can handle the abuse of constantly furling and flogging during starts and wind shots.

Our Doyle M2 CrossCut mainsail sets up on a straighter mast than the competition. We target no more than 3 cm of pre-bend at the base setting for 10 to 11 knots of wind. Although Doyle sails are considered fast in lighter conditions, Africa won the heaviest air race during the Worlds by a big margin. Our upwind sails are built from heavier, lower stretch, more durable fabric. We added luff curve to our main prior to Rolex to improve the heavy air performance without compromising our light air speed.

This summer, we developed the AIRX 650 Spinnaker we used at Worlds. We found this design had more power all the time, from soaking to full planing conditions. Our speed advantage has generally been upwind, but we now have an edge downwind, which did not go unnoticed. The kite allowed the team to improve their downwind planing technique each day, knowing the difference between a good run and a bad one can change the outcome of a regatta in just one leg.

Africa downwind at Worlds 2016Learning to sail the boat flatter upwind and depower just enough to accelerate again after a nasty set of waves took some getting used to. Every beat of the Rolex series, the team did a better job of steering and trimming to maintain that mode and accelerate in waves without heeling too much. At the top of the wind range, they tensioned the rig to the highest setting with tighter lowers, allowing use of the backstay without washing out the main. Doyle refined our rig setting protocol to a 2:1 ration of turns above base. Considering numerous poor starts, Jud became very confident in their speed, as they were forced to sail back ‘from the dead’ in bad air and skinny lanes.

Transitioning from the big boat series to the Worlds, the size of the fleet doubled and the new PRO, Mark Foster, was using a midline boat. It quickly became clear on the practice day that the committee was prepared to identify as many OCS boats as they could. Therefore, Africa took conservative and cautious pings with their Velocitek and would check their pings by running the line. Jud believes some teams are not careful enough with how they ping the line.

The first two days of the Worlds, the wind was strong enough to get racing off on time.  The earlier races as the wind was filling in were the most challenging.  During the morning races, the middle and left side could fill in first and the breeze could wobble left or right.  Not only were there patches of pressure, but there were big holes downwind that were deadly if caught in one.   The heavier air afternoon races were more straight forward starting and speed contests, and the faster boats found their way to the top of the fleet by the end of the race.  The afternoon races were generally in the ebb and got thrashy with short steep waves, much as we saw in Rolex regatta. Africa performed best in this condition relative to other teams, and it showed as they led the regatta for the first two days.  Even after the first 5 races, the top five boats were very close in the standings.

The third day was the most challenging, featuring very erratic wind and pressure, since the wind took much longer to fill in during the afternoon.   Even then, the wind did not fill down into the right side of the course.This is the day that decided the regatta.  Several of the top boats including Africa, got caught in much lighter air on the run by gybing early.   Africa and Petite Terrible got caught on wrong side of run in race 9. Flojito got caught in that light air side on the run of race 10.  Catapult stayed on the train downwind in those races and ground back to have all top 10 finishes in those challenging races 8, 9 and 10.  Finally, during race ten, conditions became fresher as the wind filled in and Africa managed another first.

Going into the final day, Africa was in 4th, knowing they needed two good races for a chance at a podium finish. They had a good start, sailed all the way out on Starboard tack to stay ahead of Calvi Network (who was within striking distance.) Flojito and Catapult went right, and although leading their side, Africa led that first beat and remained in first during race 11, bumping them up in the standings. The final race had breeze, but the standings remained the same as the top five boats in the race were the top five boats in the standings.

For Doyle, we were very pleased with a podium finish, Africa having improved their heavy air technique and speed significantly. It is obvious Africa is no longer considered a ‘light air flyer.’ Doyle sails and our recommended set up are fast in all conditions upwind and downwind, which didn’t go unnoticed. Jud is very pleased they had the chance to compete at that level and is now looking forward to sharing lessons learned with the J70 fleet in preparation for the 2017 season and the 2018 World Championship in his hometown of Marblehead, MA.

Doyle J70 Sail Descriptions

J70 Order Form

Doyle J70 Race Results

Doyle J70 Tuning Guide & Matrix

Doyle Places 9 out of Top 10 at Rhodes 19 East Coast Champs 2015

A high five between the skipper and his trimmer’s son on bow captured on camera says it all for the winners of the Rhodes-19 East Coast Champs. Charlie Pendleton, Jim Raisides, and Jack Raisides on team Bight Me take top honors at this Manchester, MA event, powered by Doyle Sails. Pendleton mentioned that young Jack was, “put to work on foredeck and could be seen flying the spinnaker in the last race.”

High Five! Photo by Blake Jackson of Marblehead Studios

High Five! Photo by Blake Jackson of Marblehead Studios

Jim Raisides was kind enough to give us an overview of the event, even giving a shout out to their humble sailmakers. (Thanks!) The results do speak for themselves with Doyle Sails placing 1,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 in the event.

“There was a lot of anticipation for this year’s East Coast Championships mostly because of the venue at the Manchester Yacht Club.  It had been 25 years since Manchester had last hosted a Rhodes 19 event, surprising considering the huge Rhodes fleet in the harbor.

Twenty three boats raced the three day event with competitors coming from as far away as Chicago.  The competition was tough with three former National Championship winners and multiple East Coast Champions in the fleet.

All three days produced similar conditions, flat seas in light 5-10 knot breezes that began as a northerly and clocked right to an easterly.  Not as easy as it sounds, as the breeze was extremely shifty and included a lot of left oscillations that paid dividends up the course even though the predominate shift was right.

These conditions made it difficult for the race committee, but MYC and PRO Conway Felton ran a fantastic regatta with each race a fair test of sailing skill.  With the 23 boats over 8 races, there was only 2 general recalls, one “I” flag and no protests.

East Coast Champions on Bight Me. Photo by Blake Jackson of Marblehead Studios

East Coast Champions on Bight Me. Photo by Blake Jackson of Marblehead Studios

Charlie Pendleton, Jim Raisides and son Jack Raisides took this year’s top honors with 15 points posting 5 firsts including 3 on the first day. Dru Slattery and crew Linda Epstein were consistently quick across the regatta placing second with 31, followed in third by Jamie Holley sailing with his wife Janice and son Cameron. Doyle sails were on 9 of the top 10 boats!”

We’re realizing again and again, the Rhodes 19 is a fun fleet, with Pendleton mentioning in the class newsletter, “Shannon Lane and Charlie Thomas put on a great show, end to end.  When was the last time we had a live band at a Rhodes event!?”

Doyle Sailmakers Secures Largest Order to Date

C2218 With Blade JibDoyle Sailmakers, based in Salem, MA, has recently announced that it has been awarded the contract to supply the complete sail inventory for the upcoming 60m performance sloop under construction at Perini Navi.  The inventory encompasses a staggering 10,200 square meters (110,275 square feet) of sail area including what will be the world’s two largest spinnakers.  The yacht is scheduled for completion in early 2014 and will make her debut at the 2014 St. Barths Bucket.

The order reinforces Doyle’s commitment and expertise in engineering some of the largest projects in the Superyacht industry including the sails aboard Maltese Falcon and M5, two of the world’s largest and most sophisticated sailing yachtsEssential to the success of this program will be the contribution of Doyle CFD’s analysis which is being used to model all aspects of the sail shapes and loading, completely integrating data from the boat’s hull and rig in real sailing conditions.  This will ensure that the sails as well as the associated hardware are all up to the task of propelling this yacht through the water. 

CFD Analysis of 60m Sloop

CFD & FEA has been performed to quantify loading and refine shapes in all the sails.

After several months of discussions, the final inventory was decided on after reviewing a number of possible combinations with an eye on smooth sail crossovers for an aggressive racing schedule the boat has planned.  For upwind sailing, the boat will have a 840 sqm mainsail which is complemented by a range of headsails – a reacher, a blade jib, a working jib, and then a Code 0 for light air conditions.  The upwind inventory will be constructed of Doyle’s proprietary Stratis membranes which have proven themselves on many of the world’s most glamorous Superyachts.  This technology will enable Doyle’s engineers and sailmakers in Salem to construct high performance sails with minimal weight.

DownwindDownwind is where the boat will really shine.  “We looked at every material available for these spinnakers and realized that there wasn’t anything in existence that would deliver the performance we were looking for,” explains CEO Robbie Doyle.  “We partnered with Dimension Polyant to develop a new high-performance Polyester spinnaker fabric that is reinforced with Dyneema for durability and burst strength.”  The new cloth allows the sails to be light and soft like a traditional spinnaker yet has tensile strength on par with other, heavier options.  The addition of Dyneema to the cloth will ensure that the sail resists tears, essential to success on the Superyacht racing circuit.  The boat will have two spinnakers, one measuring in at 2448 sqm and the other at 2170 sqm.  In addition, she will be equipped with a 643 sqm spinnaker staysail set with a top down furler.

“With this project we are fortunate to take everything we have learned in the last 30 years on both Superyachts and Grand-Prix race boats and put it all together in one package,” comments Doyle.  “We are extremely excited to be working with the project management team at Perini Navi, Future Fibers and Ron Holland Design to see this through its completion.” The order caps a string of good news for Doyle Sailmakers in the Superyacht arena, highlighted by the recent debut of the 50m Sloop Ohana, new inventories for the 52m Prana, 45m Artemis, and the launch of the 40m Perini Navi Sloop State of Grace with a full Doyle inventory.  When the 60m performance sloop launches next year, it will be spectacular to see her perform. 

C2218 Upwind and Downwind

Doyle J/70 Update

With the J/70 named the 2013 Boat of the Year over 300 J/70s sold, fleets springing up all over the country and with almost 40 J/70s signed up for Key West Race Week, Doyle Sailmakers is excited to be making fast, easy to tune J/70 sails.

During the second week of December, Jud Smith and Greg Marie from Doyle One Design went to Miami, Florida for a 2 day tuning session. This tuning session was designed to check over some of the slight tweaks made to the designs and to develop a tuning guide to ensure the maximum boat speed from Doyle J/70 sails.

The latest on our J/70 designs:

  • Added a radial clew to the main for a lighter stronger clew.
  • Kept the cross-cut midsection for smooth transition at batten ends.
  • Testing has made it increasingly clear that the best VMG in light to moderate air will be achieved by sailing deep running angles.
  • Our spinnaker design has been optimized for deep soaking angles while still being able to reach when planing.

Having a few other testing partners around in Miami gave us the opportunity to test rig tune and trimming methods.



Click here to learn more about Doyle J/70 sails.

J/70 Marblehead Demos – November 18th

J/70 Sailing Demos

Sunday November 18
89 Front Street, Marblehead MA
1:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Doyle J/70 2 Boat Testing

Doyle J/70 2 Boat Testing

Help us welcome the newest and most versatile one-design racing fleet to New England – the J/70 speedster!

Get on the cutting-edge and own a J/70 – a manageable family racer/daysailer that can easily be trailered and ramp-launched. Our goal is to have 12 J/70s for Summer 2013 racing. Our goal is to have 12 J/70s for Summer 2013 racing.

Schedule of Events

  • 1:00 to 2:00 PM J/70 will be on display
  • 1:30 PM
  • JEFF JOHNSTONE, President of J/Boats will introduce the J/70
  • BILL LYNN of Atlantis Weathergear will discuss his recent J/70 sailing experience at the NYYC Invitational in Newport, RI
  • JUD SMITH of Doyle Sailmakers & WILL WELLES of North Sails will speak about their respective J/70 sail development
  • GREG WILKINSON, Boston Sailing Head Sailing Coach will present 2013 Marblehead J/70 Racing Schedule
  • 2:00 ‐ 3:30 PM J/70 Demo sails, weather permitting.

Refreshments will be served.

The event is sponsored by:
Hill & Lowden, Inc. – J/Boats – Doyle Sailmakers – North Sails – Harvey Rigging – Atlantis WeatherGear

View J/70 Open House Invite
RSVP on Facebook!

Click here for more information on Doyle J/70 sails.

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2012 Fall Etchells - Star Regatta hosted by Annapolis Yacht Club
The Annapolis Etchells Star Regatta in Annapolis was held October 20-21, 2012. Racing Etchells USA 102, Tomas Hornos, Chris Burd, Scott Sheffer and Lindsay Smith finished 2nd. Tomas sailed with a new shared outboard/inboard jib lead configuration and the new 2012 NLM-5 RS-6 jib with shorter leech length. This jib lead configuration is designed to replace in-hauling with windward sheet and provide a repeatable setting from tack to tack.

The jib leech is high enough to allow for clew blocks to be shackled on with a twist shackle or running jib sheets directly though clew ring. Lashing blocks could also be used instead through the clew ring to allow block load properly.

The shared inboard/outboard track was the brain child of tactician Luke Lawrence, sailing with Gary Gilbert on Annie. Chuck Poindexter of Sound Rigging was the first to install and test the idea on his Etchells. Frank Atkinson of Rigging Systems came up with the low profile track seen in the photos installed on Etchells USA 102. Jud Smith and Tomas collaborated on installing at an angle for range of adjustment.

Click here for more information on Doyle Etchells sails
Complete Results, Annapolis Etchells Star Regatta


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