GLOBAL LOCATIONS
DOYLE ONE DESIGN
DOYLE SUPERYACHT
GET A QUOTE
CONTACT US

Posts Tagged ‘Jud Smith’

Doyle Podium Finish at J70 Worlds

Jud Smith brought a new team together for the Rolex Big Boat Series, hosted by Saint Francis Yacht Club, serving as the only opportunity for Africa to get up to speed on bay conditions in San Francisco prior to the Worlds, a far cry from East Coast conditions.  This team consisted of Victor Diaz (tactician), Alec Anderson (trimmer), and Ed Wright (strategist.) Racing at 730 pounds (not particularly heavy relative to other teams), they finished fourth in the big boat series and went on to get a podium finish of third in the Worlds, scoring more first place finishes than any other boat.

For this windy event, Jud used the same jib design, Doyle J6R, which won him the light air San Diego North Americans. This design has always had a much higher clew, which allows for more effective inhauling and a longer foot (since all the girth measurement points move closer to the head.) Inhauling assists with pointing and improves the effective performance range of the one and only jib. We use Dimension ProRadial HTP, as it has the lowest stretch and can handle the abuse of constantly furling and flogging during starts and wind shots.

Our Doyle M2 CrossCut mainsail sets up on a straighter mast than the competition. We target no more than 3 cm of pre-bend at the base setting for 10 to 11 knots of wind. Although Doyle sails are considered fast in lighter conditions, Africa won the heaviest air race during the Worlds by a big margin. Our upwind sails are built from heavier, lower stretch, more durable fabric. We added luff curve to our main prior to Rolex to improve the heavy air performance without compromising our light air speed.

This summer, we developed the AIRX 650 Spinnaker we used at Worlds. We found this design had more power all the time, from soaking to full planing conditions. Our speed advantage has generally been upwind, but we now have an edge downwind, which did not go unnoticed. The kite allowed the team to improve their downwind planing technique each day, knowing the difference between a good run and a bad one can change the outcome of a regatta in just one leg.

Africa downwind at Worlds 2016Learning to sail the boat flatter upwind and depower just enough to accelerate again after a nasty set of waves took some getting used to. Every beat of the Rolex series, the team did a better job of steering and trimming to maintain that mode and accelerate in waves without heeling too much. At the top of the wind range, they tensioned the rig to the highest setting with tighter lowers, allowing use of the backstay without washing out the main. Doyle refined our rig setting protocol to a 2:1 ration of turns above base. Considering numerous poor starts, Jud became very confident in their speed, as they were forced to sail back ‘from the dead’ in bad air and skinny lanes.

Transitioning from the big boat series to the Worlds, the size of the fleet doubled and the new PRO, Mark Foster, was using a midline boat. It quickly became clear on the practice day that the committee was prepared to identify as many OCS boats as they could. Therefore, Africa took conservative and cautious pings with their Velocitek and would check their pings by running the line. Jud believes some teams are not careful enough with how they ping the line.

The first two days of the Worlds, the wind was strong enough to get racing off on time.  The earlier races as the wind was filling in were the most challenging.  During the morning races, the middle and left side could fill in first and the breeze could wobble left or right.  Not only were there patches of pressure, but there were big holes downwind that were deadly if caught in one.   The heavier air afternoon races were more straight forward starting and speed contests, and the faster boats found their way to the top of the fleet by the end of the race.  The afternoon races were generally in the ebb and got thrashy with short steep waves, much as we saw in Rolex regatta. Africa performed best in this condition relative to other teams, and it showed as they led the regatta for the first two days.  Even after the first 5 races, the top five boats were very close in the standings.

The third day was the most challenging, featuring very erratic wind and pressure, since the wind took much longer to fill in during the afternoon.   Even then, the wind did not fill down into the right side of the course.This is the day that decided the regatta.  Several of the top boats including Africa, got caught in much lighter air on the run by gybing early.   Africa and Petite Terrible got caught on wrong side of run in race 9. Flojito got caught in that light air side on the run of race 10.  Catapult stayed on the train downwind in those races and ground back to have all top 10 finishes in those challenging races 8, 9 and 10.  Finally, during race ten, conditions became fresher as the wind filled in and Africa managed another first.

Going into the final day, Africa was in 4th, knowing they needed two good races for a chance at a podium finish. They had a good start, sailed all the way out on Starboard tack to stay ahead of Calvi Network (who was within striking distance.) Flojito and Catapult went right, and although leading their side, Africa led that first beat and remained in first during race 11, bumping them up in the standings. The final race had breeze, but the standings remained the same as the top five boats in the race were the top five boats in the standings.

For Doyle, we were very pleased with a podium finish, Africa having improved their heavy air technique and speed significantly. It is obvious Africa is no longer considered a ‘light air flyer.’ Doyle sails and our recommended set up are fast in all conditions upwind and downwind, which didn’t go unnoticed. Jud is very pleased they had the chance to compete at that level and is now looking forward to sharing lessons learned with the J70 fleet in preparation for the 2017 season and the 2018 World Championship in his hometown of Marblehead, MA.

Doyle J70 Sail Descriptions

J70 Order Form

Doyle J70 Race Results

Doyle J70 Tuning Guide & Matrix

La Tormenta wins the Etchells Sid Doren

In the Etchells class, the Sidney Doren Memorial Regatta took place January 9-10,2016, hosted by Biscayne Bay Yacht Club. Shannon Bush, sailing with Brad Boston and Curt Oetking on La Tormenta, came out on top with a ten point lead. The three have been racing together for the past three years, and Boston believes they work really well together and most importantly, are able to have a lot of fun which allows for enjoyable regattas.  The team has had good events in the past and won smaller events, but this was the first major event they won together. Shannon and her team are always trying to climb the ladder and be faster, which seemed to click this regatta.

Catching up with Brad after the regatta, he explained that their regatta strategy was to capitalize on their boat speed, which Brad claims is incredible. Therefore, they would prioritize a big hole at the start, while trying to be as close to the favored end as possible while avoiding traffic.  The Midline boat worked well for La Tormenta and they started there in 3 out of the 4 races such that they seemed to be able to do as they pleased off the line for the first few minutes. Consistency is always a key factor and Brad figures they were able to pull that off by letting their speed get them out of any bad positions and by staying relaxed. The team would get away from the fleet and slowly pick their way through with clear air and clean lanes.  To accomplish this speed, they used Doyle’s AP-2 Main, VMG bi-radial spinnaker, and alternated between the Marblehead Light Jib (MHL) in lower velocity conditions until two people were on the deck, when they switched to the DCM Jib to hold for the remainder of the time.

Doyle Etchells Miami 2016When to change sails and settings had been the focus of the last several regattas and during the practice time prior to the Sid Doren. La Tormenta tuned up against Peter Duncan and Jud Smith’s team on Raging Rooster, and they both received some help from Moose McClintock on a powerboat. For weather models and forecasting, the team depended on Commanders, Wind Finder, and Sail Flow. Although the models were all slightly different, there was agreement that the wind would trend right, so they were sure to protect the right, especially when dark clouds came in.

We also asked Brad how his success as a five-time Viper 640 North American Champion translated into the Etchells Class. Aside from being accustomed to racing in large fleets, Brad insisted that it was the absolute inverse. The Etchells is a highly technical boat, which doesn’t have huge speed changes like a sport boat might, so every little thing matters. It is one of Brad’s favorite fleets to race in because the skills he learns from racing Etchells in speed and tuning carry over to all other one design classes. Congratulations La Tormenta on a great win on Biscayne Bay.

Full results can be found here.

For more information about Doyle’s Etchells Sails, please visit here.

J/70 North American Recap

Doyle J/70 Sails


Victor Diaz, Will Felder, Jud Smith and Marc Gauthier

Since the ’14 Newport Worlds, where we finished a respectable 9th overall, we set out to improve on that performance and hit the circuit pretty hard over the winter.   Starting in the Chesapeake, followed by Tampa, Key West, St. Pete, Miami and Charleston.  All were big regattas with plenty of competition and opportunity to improve our speed and technique. During that time, we developed our flatter J6 Radial Jib for the fresher seasonal conditions we encounter on the East Coast.  With our heavy air performance improved, we placed 4th overall at Key West without losing our good light air speed we had in Newport.   At Charleston race week, we moved up to 3rd overall and topped the Dynasty division; racing both major regattas with my daughter Lindsay, Will Felder and Marc Gauthier.  We race at 725 to 740 lbs depending on our team since I’m one of the heaviest drivers in the class at over 100 kilos.

OneRegattaAfricaDuring these travel regattas, we have refined our trimming and tuning techniques for the new J6 Radial jib.  Our high clew jib allows us to inhaul the jib to the cabin house nonskid, which powers up the main and generates more helm and point.   As the wind speed increases to the 7 to 8 knots max power condition, we start to depower by lowering the traveler toward center line and tension the outhaul all before touching the backstay.  We only start using the backstay once the outhaul is tensioned and traveler car is nearing centerline to keep from having too much helm.  Managing the correct amount of power while sailing close hauled is crucial for the Main Trimmer and Helmsman.

Jib development prior to La Rochelle Worlds

This summer we raced Africa in our local Fleet 9, only missing one race day during my trip to J/70 worlds in La Rochelle on Peter Duncan’s “Relative Obscurity”.   We tested our current J6 Radial jib design in mid-June with Roller Battens in preparation for the Worlds.  The Jib performed very well at the Worlds even though the experimental roller battens showed signs of fatigue by the end of a windy event, but overall performed well – winning the last race of the Worlds to place 7th overall.  (The roller batten jibs may have a future in the J/70 once the batten durability improves.)

After returning from the Worlds in July, we made a standard vertical batten version of J6R, which we used to win the competitive J/70 New England Championships during Marblehead Race Week, in a wide range of windspeeds a sea conditions. That was our first win in a sanctioned J/70 championship event since we had started racing in 2013.  So we were improving each regatta in 2015 with the NA’s fast approaching.  Meanwhile Team Hooligan, one of our training partners at the North Americans, won Cleveland Race Week (they placed 7th at NA’s using the same main and jib combo as us.)  At the end of August, we won the regional ONE Regatta in light air conditions that were a lot like San Diego.

Sail Selection for the North Americans

21694845472_a747137697_oIt’s unique to sail a big regatta in a venue where the conditions are so consistently light, but thankfully there was plenty of time to prepare for this.  Leading up to September, I got invited to do a two-boat testing session in San Diego with Joel Ronning and his “Catapult” team.  Joel had set up a two boat J/70 testing camp in San Diego for the month leading up to the NA’s and invited all the top sailmakers in the class to join in for a few days and test their designs at that venue.  I couldn’t resist that opportunity, since Ronning was second at the Newport Worlds and has been one of the top boats on the circuit since the outset.

From that 2 days of testing on the NA’s track we learned our J6R performed just fine even in the light air and was especially quick with crew on the rail.  What we also found was that our older Main from the 2014 NA’s in Rochester was a bit softer now and provided more power that would be needed for the light air anticipated for NA’s.   While we came away from the New England’s with a win, I felt like for us to be competitive at our weight range in light air, we would need a better downrange soaking kite if we were going to have a shot at the podium.21098589443_b8c69acdea_o

After returning from the San Diego testing session, we raced in our fleet on Labor Day weekend in perfect San Diego light air and had great upwind speed versus our competitive fleet; but of more significance, we tested a refined early VMG design from 2013 that had always been a good light air spinnaker.  We nicknamed it “Billy Baroo” after Judge Smails old wooded putter he used to sink his final putt in Caddyshack. That kite generated the most sheet load and would fly the most eased of any of our kites.  That performance difference was generally dismissed and we decided that I was too heavy to be fast downwind. Initially, we dismissed the design because we were also too concerned about its planing ability, but testing a spinnaker’s planing performance is not an exact science. There are so many factors when comparing planing performance, that it is hard to prove one kite is clearly better than another in those conditions.  One thing was for certain, since I am one of the heaviest skipper in the 70 class, and we would be one of the heavier crews, selecting the best spinnaker would be critical to our success.

21085390163_6a37f09239_oWe were able to test both days prior to the practice day and final day of measurement.   On Monday, we tested inside the bay in very light air with Hooligan and Savasana.  On Tuesday, we were able to test on the NA’s track with many top boats in 6-8 knots.  We had competitive speed upwind, and experimented with different tuning settings to see which one worked best.  We found that 2 settings below our base was the best for those conditions, that were unstable 6 to 8 knots.   Downwind we swapped between kites to see which we liked better and selected the “Billy Baroo” as our primary kite and AP as our back up.  At this point, most of the class has 2 viable spinnakers, and it makes sense to add in a specialized Light Air VMG spinnaker for regattas when you know the breeze is going to be under 10 knots and declare that as your primary spinnaker.

Regatta Strategy

Going into the NA’s, we knew that to be among the top boats at the end of the regatta would need good consistent scores and I didn’t think any one boat was going to  dominate the event.  There was plenty of talent in the fleet and with all the races counting, the outcome would come down to the last race.  The goal was to be one of those boats with a shot at the title going into that final race.

One thing that cannot be stressed enough that made a difference was having a consistent crew.  Will Felder and Marc Gauthier sailed with me for most of the regattas this year, and we worked Victor Diaz in for a number of practice sessions as well.  His knowledge with the San Diego venue proved invaluable and allowed all of us to work well together and keep our eyes on the prize throughout the regatta.  Having confidence in  your crew is essential to coming away from big regattas with a win.

Starting Strategy

The Velocitek ProStart does change the game, since everyone knows where the line is.  There are some teams that like to mix it up at the ends of the line, but it is hard to pull off good starts near an end over the course of a 10 to 12 race series.  Most of the fleet likes to start near the favored end, or in the case of San Diego near the windward end.  If it looked too congested at the weather end with a couple of minutes to go, we would often bail out and move down the line.  The times we started in a congested area, we would have been better off moving down the line.  If the line was 15 or more degrees favored at the pin, the fleet would move to that end.   10 degree bias seemed to be about the right bias to spread out the fleet across the line.J 70 Start

In a big fleet, we generally do a port approach (unless it is heavy air) and try to get on starboard between 1:30 and 1 minute to go.  I still try to approach the line with seconds and meters closely matching during that final minute on starboard. If it’s lighter, we have the jib deployed to be able to approach the line at a meter a second ratio and still have some time to scrub off.   When it is 8 + knots, we approach with the jib furled, since we can approach at a meter a second ratio with just the main only.  In that condition we generally deploy at 30 seconds but even later the windier it gets.  Once the jib is deployed, the J/70 accelerates quickly, except in the light conditions.  Deploying the jib in fresher conditions too early makes it hard to hold back and protect space to leeward.  Any time I find myself with a minute to go and only 30 meters from the line, unless it is very light air, it generally does not end well.

More information on Doyle’s J/70 sails here.

Africa Wins 2015 J/70 North American Championship

21706410105_34958098a5_o

Jud Smith, Head of Doyle One Design, sailing with  Marc Gauthier, Victor Diaz, and William Felder on Africa, overcame a 15 point deficit on the final day of the J/70 North Americans to take the title in the competitive 50-boat fleet.  Smith had sailed consistently through the 4 day event, with only one race outside the top 10 going into the final day, but it was the final two races that moved him from second into first.

Doug Strebel and the Zounds team led for the first thee days of the event, posting all top six scores except for one race yesterday. Tim Healy finished third, a position he had held throughout the four day event.

With light winds and a 2:00pm deadline for the final race start, Smith only had two races to shorten Strebel’s 15-point lead. Winds blew at an average of 6-8kts over the racing venue, set up just offshore from Coronado beach. The first race of the day was a four-leg course, with two upwind and two downwind sprints. Smith  finished in 9th place, while Strebel  fell to the second half of the fleet, finishing in 25th.

21519588429_5bff263873_oIn addition to a major change on the scoreboard, Race 9 also had significant changes of its own. John Brigden (Cool Story, Bro) was poised for a top finish after an early lead in the upwind leg, but ultimately fell behind and finished in 14th place. Shannon Bush (Hooligan) and Thomas Bowen (Reach Around) both conceded two places during the second two legs, finishing in 6th and 4th, respectively.

Joel Ronning (Catapult) won Race 9, followed by Jeff Brown (J/70) in 2nd place and Julian Fernandez Neckelmann (Flojito y Cooperando) in 3rd.

Going into the final race of the regatta, a two-point spread separated Smith in 1st from Strebel in 2nd. Since competitors were not eligible for any throw-out scores, every race counted towards the final showdown.

21680330196_83e0fe1033_oBy the time the fleet made it to the first upwind mark, Brad Rodi (Bl!ss) was leading the race with regatta leader Smith just four boats behind. Strebel was well behind the top third of the fleet during the second leg. He finished the race in 18th place, guaranteeing that Smith would take home the title.

For more information on Doyle’s J/70 sails, please visit here.

For complete regatta results, please visit here.

 

Doyle Sails Dominate 2015 Marblehead NOOD Regatta

Marblehead Race Week, now sailed as the Marblehead NOOD Regatta, got underway last week for the 126th running of the regatta with 140 boats competing in 9 different One Design Classes.  As is the case in many years, Doyle-powered boats won the majority of the classes at the Marblehead NOOD Regatta, one of the northeast’s premier annual One-Design Regattas.   Among other highlights, Doyle customers swept the podium in the Rhodes 19, Town Class, and IOD classes, as well as winning the J/70, J/105 at Etchells classes.

Holley WinIn the Rhodes 19 class, the fleet saw one of the most competitive finishes in recent history, with 7 lead changes over the 4 day event and a mere 8 points separated first through sixth.  In the end, Jamie Holley, sailing Mankini with his wife Janice for the first three days and then his son Cameron for the final day, took home the win in a tie-breaker.    When asked what his favorite part of race week was, Jamie answered, “My family. My wife crewed the first few days, and then my son did the last.”  Team Mankini was named the overall winner of Race Week for their performance.Race Week-0040

Holley and his crew beat out second place co-skippers Ken Cormier and Steve Dalton in an overall points tie because Holley ended with two race wins compared to Cormier’s one – both of which he scored in the final two races. “It was a very tough week of sailing,” said Holley. “We were only one of two fleets that had to sail all four days. We were 12 points down coming into the last day of sailing, and we pulled through.”  He added, “There was everything from light air and flat water, to heavy air and high seas. I want to say it takes consistency to win, but we weren’t very consistent. There were at times five boats wide round the mark, and sometimes other factors made it a very complicated regatta.” Interestingly, in the 33-boat fleet, Holley was the only one to win more than one race, with 10 others each winning one race.  Holley was using Doyle’s well proven race sails that have been extensively developed in recent years.

J/70 Africa 2015 NOOD Regatta

Africa Comes into the Windward Mark in the Lead

In the 23-boat J/70 fleet, Jud Smith and AFRICA put on a dominating performance, much of which Smith attributes to just plain better boat speed, coupled with some strong tactical calls from his wife Cindy.  The regatta also doubled as the J/70 New England Championship, and featured some strong competition from as far away as Texas.  Winning 5 of the 10 races, Smith felt good in the range of conditions he saw through the three days of racing.  “We felt like our upwind boat speed and pointing ability was phenomenal.  We’ve fine tuned the jib design a bit in the last few months to allow us to inhaul better which helps with out height off the line.  We were sailing a bit heavy this regatta, so making sure we made our gains upwind was essential to making the whole race work” commented Smith reflecting on the week.  At the end of the regatta, he received the Norman E. Cressy Trophy, which is awarded by the Marblehead Racing Association to the skipper who best displays the outstanding performance at Marblehead Race Week as it relates to fleet competitiveness, sportsmanship and overall smart sailing.  In addition to Smith, three of the top four Corinthian Teams were using Doyle Sails.

Doyle J/105 Sails

allegro semplicita Powers in to the Windward Mark

In the J/105 Class, it was Fred deNapoli on Allegro Semplicita who came away with the win after several lead changes.  Despite his success in other regattas with his boat, deNapoli  had to be pleased with his performance this year, as he previously looked back on his 12 years in the class, remarking “In 2003, I borrowed a J/105 and came in second by a point or two. Last year I again came in second by a point or so. We’ve always been the bridesmaid, and never the bride.”  deNapoli was using Doyle’s latest Stratis jib design, along with a AP Crosscut Main and Airx 700 Class Spinnaker.

Doyle Town Class Sails

Berit Solstad on Lille Venn

In the Town Class, sailing with one of the largest fleets in recent memory. Berit Solstad came away with a commanding victory over local rival Kelley Braun.  After years of dominance in the Town Class, Doyle successful introduced a new mainsail design, which was utilized by Solstad in the victory.

The Etchells fleet, a longtime favorite in Marblehead, was also successful for Doyle One Design’s own Tomas Hornos, who came away with the win after winning half of the 8 races.  Hornos is a relative newcomer in the Etchells fleet, but has put together a string of impressive performances in the last year.

Race Week-0045-1The Marblehead IOD fleet has always been one of the most photogenic fleets around, with classic boats and matching fleet sails, which make for close racing.  This year it was Charlie Richter racing Javelin who came out on top.  Doyle has been proud to supply sails to the IOD fleet in Marblehead, among other venues, and has consistently produced top level sails that perform well over the many years that the sails rotate through.

To learn more about Doyle’s One Design Sails, please visit here.

For Full Regatta Results, please visit here.

Pictures courtesy Bruce Durkee

Inaugural J/70 Worlds will feature top Doyle Sailors and Sailmakers

Doyle Sailmakers is proud to be involved in the inaugural J/70 Worlds in Newport, R.I., running from September 8-13 at the New York Yacht Club.  Many of our Doyle customers and sailmakers will be competing in this inaugural event. Doyle’s One Design team has built sails for many of the competitors and with over 90 boats on the starting line for this event, the starting line will be crowded with numerous world champions in other classes – all vying to be the first J/70 world champion.

J70August2014

The boat has also recently been chosen as Sailing World’s 2014 Boat of the Year and is designated as an International Class by ISAF (International Sailing Federation). At only two and half years old but over 600 boats sailing in over 20 countries, Doyle Sailmakers is proud to be one of the premiere one-design sailmakers for the fleet.

Adding to the luster of competing in the inaugural worlds is the fact that many of Doyle’s sailmakers will be a part of this event, including 2006 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year Jud Smith, who has been building sails for many Doyle customers in the J/70 fleet as they prepare for this event.

“Although this is the Worlds, at this time it will primarily US Boats being sailed but this will be the regatta to peak for,” Smith said. “It will be interesting to see how some of the boats do who are peaking right now. There are some boats who are at the right time to peak and there are certain players who have emerged strong very recently – so this is their time.”

Relative_ObscurityMany Doyle customers and sailmakers will be at this event. Peter Duncan, who got into the J/70 class early on, has been training all summer after campaigning his Etchells for most of last year. Sailing USA 49 “Relative Obscurity”  he brings along long-time crew Tom Blackwell and has added Mark Ivy and Doyle’s own Greg Marie.  Earlier this year, Duncan finished 3rd in the 40 boat fleet at Bacardi Miami Sailing Week.

Jud Smith will be sailing with his wife Cindy, Jake Ladow, and Doyle One Design’s Will Felder.  Earlier this summer, Smith won the J/70 class at the Marblehead NOOD regatta.

Doyle CFD’s Tyler Doyle, who has spent extensive time developing proprietary software to analyze sail shape and boat setup in real time for the J/70, will be sailing with Chris Boulter, Indre Jankeviciute, and Terra Berlinski on USA 245.

J70August2014-2

Brad Boston of Doyle Boston (Canada), fresh from winning the Viper 640 North Americans last week, will be racing with team “Hooligan”, with skipper Tres Sheehan, Curtis Florence and Lindsay Bartal.

Mark Ploch of Doyle City Island in New York will be racing his USA 61 “Sugar Daddy” with Mark Foster, Rob Fear and Tomas Hornos from Doyle One Design.

We are looking forward to a very exciting and successful regatta.

Full regatta information can be found here.

Jud Smith Preparing for the 2014 Etchells World Championships

Starting Gun – The Etchells Worlds and a Conversation with Jud Smith

We caught up with Jud Smith of Marblehead, Mass. at Doyle Sailmakers this past week, as he gets ready for the upcoming Etchells Worlds in Newport, R.I. starting on June 21-28.  Smith is a Rolex Yachtsmen of the Year and former Etchells Worlds champion who just so happens to be building many of the sails for the event. He will be racing with his long time team of Peter Duncan and Tom Blackwell. As both sailmaker to other competitors and a competitor himself, we asked Jud to take a moment to give us an overview of the upcoming event – and the state of Etchells’ sailing overall.

Peter Duncan, Tom Blackwell and Jud Smith Training in Newport

Peter Duncan, Tom Blackwell and Jud Smith Training in Newport

Q. What is different about this upcoming event in Newport, R.I.?

A. The World’s in Newport is going to be a big draw. Canada is close, and it is off-season for the Australians. The World’s has become the premier event for Australians and we have John Bertrand here along with many other teams.  In 1998, the Etchells Worlds was held in Marblehead, and it was the last time we had 100 -boat strong Etchells Worlds.  We are figuring we will have 95 boats on the line for this one.  Newport is unique and to have an Etchells Worlds on the east coast is rare. We don’t get the Worlds in the US that often and it will be awhile before we have one nearby again (next year’s event is in Hong Kong).  

Q. With such an international fleet descending on Newport, R.I.; will this be the first time some of these competitors will race against each other?2014 Worlds Practice Start

A. Many of these teams have competed in the Jaguar Series in Miami and that is what we last did as a team before we began pre-worlds races for this event. Most of the major American boats were at the Jaguar series, as well as European and Canadian teams. Many of us have met each other on the race course before this.

[“The Jag”, as it has come to be known, is a four regatta series, spread out over four weekends between December and March, and brings together many of the best Etchells sailors in the world.]

Q. How important are these winter series like the Jaguar Series to the Etchells fleet?

A. The Jaguar Series has really helped the Etchells fleet and it has been a very popular format. It is more common now that you have to go where the sailing is – and a lot of competitors find it in Miami. The sport has evolved and whereas the summers are short and it is not always easy to get people involved in weekend racing – the competition stretches out over the year. It is so much more migratory.

Q. Will this Etchells Worlds feature a heavier contingent of professional -level sailors or will it include fleet racers from the region as well.

A.  What is different about the Etchells is that many of the owners are not pro-sailors but they do have pro teams. The talent pool is incredible so what has changed is that the boats are loaded with talent. It is not like the old days where you could fill in with individuals from the host club. That being said, it is hard for the club sailor to be competitive amidst this caliber of competition. However, for the club racer, they can come and get to sail against the very best in the world and talk and mingle after the racing.

Q. What else is unique about this talented Etchells fleet?

A. Today, the Etchells is not so much a summer racing class but a traveling class.   Etchells fleets are not gone, they are just not exactly where they used to be and more competitors take time over the course of a year, and not just weekends in a short summer season, to compete. The Etchells is one of the few keelboat classes that is still vibrant and does enable older sailors to compete. And, as it has evolved into a fleet that is deep with sailing talent, the more mature sailors tend to be the ones that have the resources and the time to race.2014 Worlds Practice 1

Q. As the sailmaker to the sailors, do you think you have any advantage over the other professionals in the fleet?

A. When you are the sailmaker for the event, the process for the customers  started a long time ago. The Doyle team boats have been training on weekends in Newport. As a sailmaker, we live and breath this every day. Any advantage I could have had is probably negated by the amount of time I have put into working with our many customers and helping make sure they are up to speed.  As much as sailmaking has evolved into being more automated and as such precise, there is still a lot of craftsmanship that our team has put into our sails – its been an exciting but exhausting few weeks leading up to the regatta.